Tuesday, July 12, 2016

"TRUMBO" (2015) Review

trumbo-tr_10824_r_rgbsmall_wide-6b897da6ba838b0d0d2435f72a0f1d59e53e0460-s900-c85


"TRUMBO" (2015) Review

I tried to think of a number of movies about the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) and the Hollywood Blacklist I have seen. And to be honest, I can only think of two of which I have never finished and two of which I did. One of those movies I did finish was the 2015 biopic about Hollywood screenwriter, Dalton Trumbo

Based upon Bruce Alexander Cook's 1977 biography, the movie covered fourteen years of the screenwriter's life - from being subpoenaed to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities in 1947 to 1960, when he was able to openly write movies and receive screen credit after nine to ten years of being blacklisted by the Motion Picture Alliance for the Protection of American Ideals. Due to this time period, it was up to production designer Mark Rickler to visually convey fourteen years in Southern California - from the late 1940s to the early 1960s. I must say that he, along with cinematographer Jim Denault and art directors Lisa Marinaccio and Jesse Rosenthal did an excellent job by taking advantage of the New Orleans locations. That is correct. Certain areas around New Orleans, Louisiana stood for mid-century Los Angeles, California. But the movie also utilized a few locations in Southern California; including a residential house in northeastern Los Angeles, and the famous Roosevelt Hotel in the heart of Hollywood. And thanks to Denault's cinematography, Rickler's production designs not only made director Jay Roach's "Southern California" look colorful, but nearly realistic. But one of my minor joys of "TRUMBO" came from the costume designs. Not only do I admire how designer Daniel Orlandi re-created mid-20th century fashion for the film industry figures in Southern California, as shown in the images below:

image5

566b26005248f-e1d2eq2ng8 

I was especially impressed by Orlandi's re-creation of . . . you guessed it! Columnist Hedda Hopper's famous hats, as shown in the following images:

image7 Women-of-Trumbo14-e1458032178821

I have read two reviews for "TRUMBO". Both reviewers seemed to like the movie, yet both were not completely impressed by it. I probably liked it a lot more than the two. "TRUMBO" proved to be the second movie I actually paid attention to about the Blacklist. I think it has to do with the movie's presentation. "TRUMBO" seemed to be divided into three acts. The first act introduced the characters and Trumbo's problems with the House Committee on Un-American Activities, leading to his being imprisoned for eleven months on charges of contempt of Congress, for his refusal to answer questions from HUAC. The second act focused on those years in which Trumbo struggled to remain employed as a writer for the low-budget King Brothers Productions, despite being blacklisted by the major studios. And the last act focused upon Trumbo's emergence from the long shadow of the blacklist, thanks to his work on "SPARTACUS" and "EXODUS".

I have only one real complaint about "TRUMBO". Someone once complained that the movie came off as uneven. And I must admit that the reviewer might have a point. I noticed that the film's first act seemed to have a light tone - despite Trumbo's clashes with Hollywood conservatives and HUAC. Even those eleven months he had spent in prison seemed to have an unusual light tone, despite the situation. But once the movie shifted toward Trumbo's struggles trying to stay employed, despite the blacklist, the movie's tone became somewhat bleaker. This was especially apparent in those scenes that featured the screenwriter's clashes with his family over his self-absorbed and strident behavior towards them and his dealings with fellow (and fictional) screenwriter Arlen Hird. But once actor Kirk Douglas and director Otto Preminger expressed interest in ignoring the Blacklist and hiring Trumbo for their respective movies, the movie shifted toward a lighter, almost sugarcoated tone again. Now, there is nothing wrong with a movie shifting from one tone to another in accordance to the script. My problem with these shifts is that they struck me as rather extreme and jarring. There were moments when I found myself wondering if I was watching a movie directed by two different men.

Another problem I had with "TRUMBO" centered around one particular scene that featured Hedda Hopper and MGM studio bossLouis B. Mayer. In this scene, Hopper forces Mayer to fire any of his employees who are suspected Communists, including Trumbo. The columnist did this by bringing up Mayer's Jewish ancestry and status as an immigrant from Eastern Europe. This scene struck me as a blatant copy of one featured in the 1999 HBO movie, "RKO 281". In that movie, Hopper's rival, Louella Parsons (portrayed by Brenda Blethyn) utilized the same method to coerce - you guess it - Mayer (portrayed by David Suchet) to convince other studio bosses to withhold their support of the 1941 movie, "CITIZEN KANE". Perhaps the filmmakers for "TRUMBO" felt that no one would remember the HBO film. I did. Watching that scene made me wonder if I had just witnessed a case of plagiarism. And I felt rather disappointed.

Despite these jarring shifts in tone, I still ended up enjoying "TRUMBO" very much. Instead of making an attempt to cover Dalton Trumbo's life from childhood to death, the movie focused upon a very important part in the screenwriter's life - the period in which his career in Hollywood suffered a major decline, due to his political beliefs. And thanks to Jay Roach's direction and John McNamara's screenplay, the movie did so with a straightforward narrative. Some of the film's critics had complained about its sympathetic portrayal of Trumbo, complaining that the movie had failed to touch upon Trumbo's admiration of the Soviet Union. Personally, what would be the point of that? A lot of American Communists did the same, rather naively and stupidly in my opinion. But considering that this movie mainly focused upon Trumbo's experiences as a blacklisted writer, what would have been the point? Trumbo was not professionally and politically condemned for regarding the Soviet Union as the epitome of Communism at work. He was blacklisted for failing to cooperate with the House Committee on Un-American Activities. 

Also, the movie did not completely whitewash Trumbo. McNamara's screenplay did not hesitate to condemn how Trumbo's obsession with continuing his profession as a screenwriter had a negative impact upon his relationship with his family - especially his children. It also had a negative impact with his relationship with fellow screenwriter (the fictional) Arlen Hird, who wanted Trumbo to use his work for the King Brothers to express their liberal politics. Trumbo seemed more interested in staying employed and eventually ending the Blacklist. I came away with the feeling that the movie was criticizing the screenwriter for being more interested in regaining his successful Hollywood career than in maintaining his politics. 

"TRUMBO" also scared me. The movie scared me in a way that the 2010 movie, "THE CONSPIRATOR" did. It reminded me that I may disagree with the political or social beliefs of another individual; society's power over individuals - whether that society came in the form of a government (national, state or local) or any kind of corporation or business industry - can be a frightening thing to behold. It can be not only frightening, but also corruptive. Watching the U.S. government ignore the constitutional rights of this country's citizens (including Trumbo) via the House Committee on Un-American Activities scared the hell out of me. Watching HUAC coerce and frighten actor Edward G. Robinson into exposing people that he knew as Communists scared me. What frightened me the most is that it can happen again. Especially when I consider how increasingly rigid the world's political climate has become.

I cannot talk about "TRUMBO" without focusing on the performances. Bryan Cranston earned a slew of acting nominations for his portrayal of Dalton Trumbo. I have heard that the screenwriter was known for being a very colorful personality. What is great about Cranston's performance is that he captured this trait of Trumbo's without resorting to hammy acting. Actually, I could say the same about the rest of the cast. Helen Mirren portrayed the movie's villain, Hollywood columnist Hedda Hopper with a charm and charisma that I personally found both subtle and very scary. Diane Lane gave a subtle and very convincing performance as Trumbo's wife Cleo, who not only stood by her husband throughout his travails, but also proved to be strong-willed when his self-absorption threatened to upset the family dynamics. Louis C.K., the comic actor gave a poignant and emotional performance as the fictional and tragic screenwriter, Arden Hird. 

Other memorable performances caught my attention as well. Elle Fanning did an excellent job portraying Trumbo's politically passionate daughter, who grew to occasionally resent her father's pre-occupation with maintaining his career. Michael Stuhlbarg did a superb job in conveying the political and emotional trap that legendary actor Edward G. Robinson found himself, thanks to HUAC. Both John Goodman and Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje gave colorful and entertaining performances as studio head Frank King and Trumbo's fellow convict Virgil Brooks, respectively. Stephen Root was equally effective as the cautious and occasionally paranoid studio boss, Hymie King. Roger Bart gave an excellent performance as fictional Hollywood producer Buddy Ross, a venal personality who seemed to lack Robinson's sense of guilt for turning his back on the blacklisted Trumbo and other writers. David James Elliot gave a very interesting performance as Hollywood icon John Wayne, conveying the actor's fervent anti-Communist beliefs and willingness to protect Robinson from Hedda Hopper's continuing hostility toward the latter. And in their different ways, both Dean O'Gorman and Christian Berkel gave very entertaining performances as the two men interested in employing Trumbo by the end of the 1950s - Kirk Douglas and Otto Preminger. 

I noticed that "TRUMBO" managed to garner only acting nominations for the 2015-2016 award season. Considering that the Academy Award tends to nominate at least 10 movies for Best Picture, I found it odd that the organization was willing to nominate the likes of "THE MARTIAN" (an unoriginal, yet entertaining feel-good movie) and "MAD MAX: FURY ROAD" (for which I honestly do not have a high regard) in that category. "TRUMBO" was not perfect. But I do not see why it was ignored for the Best Picture category, if movies like "THE MARTIAN" can be nominated. I think director Jay Roach, screenwriter John McNamara and a cast led by the always talented Bryan Cranston did an excellent job in conveying a poisonous period in both the histories of Hollywood and this country.

No comments: