Monday, August 31, 2015

"LOST IN AUSTEN" (2008) Review

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"LOST IN AUSTEN" (2008) Review

I must admit that I am usually not a fan of novels or any other forms of storytelling that are based upon or continuations of published works of the origin author. This is certainly the case for the numerous works (sans two) based upon Jane Austen's six published novels. 

The 2008 miniseries, "LOST IN AUSTEN" is not based upon any particular Austen novel that was not written by the Georgian Era writer. Instead, it is the brainchild of screenwriter Guy Andrews. The latter created this fantasy-comedy, which is an adaptation of Austen's novel, "Pride and Prejudice"."LOST IN AUSTEN" told the story of one Amanda Price, a twenty-something career woman, who lives in Hammersmith, a suburb of London. Amanda works at a bank and shares a flat with another twenty-something named Pirhana. She dates an obtuse and slightly crude young man named Michael, with whom she has become disenchanted. Amanda is also a die-hard Jane Austen fan. And her favorite pastime is reading the author's published works - especially her favorite novel, "Pride and Prejudice".

One evening, Amanda finds the novel's main character in her bathroom - namely one Elizabeth Bennet. Amanda decides to regard the latter as a vision and views the incident as a reminder that she can do better than Michael. But when Elizabeth re-appears the following evening, Amanda steps through a secret doorway shown by the former and finds herself inside Longbourn, the Bennet family home . . . and stuck in the novel, near the beginning. Amanda manages to become the Bennets' houseguest by claiming that she and Elizabeth are pen pals who had become confused over the dates they were supposed to visit each other. During her stay in this fictional early 19th century world; Amanda not only discovers that Austen's characters are not what she had always assumed they were, but that her interactions with them may have somewhat scrambled the author's tale.

"LOST IN AUSTEN" struck me as this mixture of the 1991 Diana Gabaldon novel, "Outlander" and the television series, "ONCE UPON A TIME". Guy Andrews' tale is basically a mixture of time travel and the collision of the real and literary worlds. I am not one of those purists who believe that a film or television adaptation should strictly follow its literary source. However, Amanda Price's adventures in "Austen Land" not only forced her to deal with the customs and mores of early 19th century Britain, but also changes in the novel that would have left the author spinning in her grave.

Some of those changes resulted from Amanda's determination to maintain the story's original narrative - namely Charles Bingley's brief infatuation with her, Jane Bennet's marriage to William Collins and Charlotte Lucas' decision to become a missionary in Southern Africa. Other equally hilarious and mind boggling changes simply took Amanda . . . and the audience by surprise. Lydia Bennet proved to be a lot more likable than the Austen's version. The three biggest characterization changes proved to be Caroline Bingley, Georgiana Darcy and George Wickham. One of the more interesting aspects of Andrews' screenplay was the difference between Fitzwilliam Darcy's romance with Elizabeth Bennet in Austen's novel and his romance with Amanda Price in this production. The differences were probably the result of Amanda's knowledge of the story, her blunt speaking personality and Mr. Darcy's more ruthless approach toward propriety.

How do I feel about these changes? They injected a crazy spin on Austen's tale that left me shaking with laughter. I also found these changes chaotic, funny and at times, simply insane. What can I say? I loved Andrews' tale. I am usually a little wary of revisionist novels or cinematic adaptations of the former. But "LOST IN AUSTEN" proved to be so original and hilarious that I had completely dismissed my apprehensions about the production and fully embraced it.

Mind you, "LOST IN AUSTEN" was not perfect. I found it odd that other members of the Bennet family barely made a fuss over Amanda's lack of wardrobe, or the fact that she seemed to be borrowing the missing Elizabeth's clothes. I found the time-travel method to transport Amanda to Austen's tale a bit lame, but this seemed to be the case in many time travel stories. My biggest gripe proved to be Lady Catherine de Bourgh's socializing with Charles and Caroline Bingley. Apparently, Andrews (and many other Austen fans) seemed to harbor the misconception that the Bingleys were members of the upper-class and the Bennets were part of the middle-class. The opposite was true. The Bennets came from the landed gentry. And the Bingleys made their money in trade, which made them members of the middle-class. There is no way in hell that an ultra-snob like Lady Catherine de Bourgh would associate with the likes of Caroline Bingley or her brother Charles.

The main virtue of "LOST IN AUSTEN" proved to be its cast. Jemima Rooper turned out to be the woman of the hour in her superb portrayal of "the woman out of time", Amanda Price. Considering the crazy shenanigans that permeated Andrews' story, I have to give kudos to Rooper for not only carrying this production on her shoulders and making it all so effortless. One of the most amazing aspects of "LOST IN AUSTEN" was the electric chemistry between Rooper and her leading man, Elliot Cowan. I heard or read somewhere that Cowan was a last minute casting for the role of Fitzwilliam Darcy. I say . . . thank God!. I have to say it. Cowan gave, in my opinion, a brilliant performance and probably the most interesting interpretation of the Fitzwilliam Darcy character I have ever seen. Or should I say . . . the most ruthless? I have never come across a Mr. Darcy so ruthlessly determined to adhere to society's rules. And when the character finally succumbed to feelings for Amanda, his Mr. Darcy struck me as the most romantic.

"LOST IN AUSTEN" also featured some first-rate performances from the supporting cast. Tom Riley did an outstanding job in his portrayal of a more ambiguous George Wickham, who seemed less of the fortune seeker and more of the decent and a surprisingly chivalrous friend for Amanda and the Bennet family. Morven Christie gave an excellent performance as the eldest Bennet sibling Jane, whose long-suffering in this story revealed the character's true strength and backbone. Hugh Bonneville gave an entertaining and witty performance as Mr. Bennet, the family patriarch. I found Alex Kingston's portrayal of Mrs. Bennet to be very interesting. Her take on the role seemed more ruthless and a lot less silly than other interpretations. Another interesting performance came from Tom Mison, whose portrayal of Charles Bingley struck me as more refreshingly complex than other portrayals. 

Christina Cole, who co-starred with Rooper in the Sky One 2004-2005 series "HEX", gave a wickedly subtle performance as Caroline Bingley, Amanda's rival for Mr. Darcy's attention. In many ways, her performance reminded me of her role in the 2009 miniseries, "EMMA", but with more of a sophisticated touch. After seeing "LOST IN AUSTEN", I feel that Guy Henry's take on the William Collins character has to be the skeeviest and yet, funniest version I have ever seen. Lindsay Duncan, on the other hand, injected a good deal of sophistication into her portrayal of the autocratic Lady Catherine de Bourgh. And Gemma Arterton gave a very nuanced performance as the time traveling Elizabeth Bennet. However, I must admit that her take on the character seemed a bit more introspective than previous performances. The miniseries also featured solid performances from the likes of Perdita Weeks, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Michelle Duncan, Daniel Percival, Ruby Bentall and Florence Hoath.

Yes, Guy Andrews' screenplay for "LOST IN AUSTEN" had a few hiccups. What movie or television production does not? But overall, Andrews created a wildly entertaining and imaginative look into the pages of Jane Austen through the eyes of a modern day, early 21st century woman. And Dan Zeff's well-paced direction, along with a talented cast led by Jemima Rooper and Elliot Cowan, added a great deal of pleasure to his story.

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Favorite Films Set in the 1810s and 1820s

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Below is a list of my favorite movies set during the 1810s and 1820s: 


FAVORITE FILMS SET IN THE 1810s AND 1820s

1 - Sense and Sensibility

1. "Sense and Sensibility" (1995) - Ang Lee directed this superb adaptation of Jane Austen's 1811 novel about two sisters in love and financial straits. Adapted by Emma Thompson, the movie starred both her and Kate Winslet.



2 - Persuasion 1995

2. "Persuasion" (1995) - Amanda Root and Ciarán Hinds starred in this entertaining adaptation of Jane Austen's 1818 novel about the reunion between two former lovers. Roger Michell directed. - Tie



2 - Persuasion 2007

2. "Persuasion" (2007) - I am also a big fan of this equally entertaining adaptation of Austen's 1818 novel about the two former lovers, Anne Elliot and Captain Frederick Wentworth. Adrian Shergold directed. - Tie





3. "The Revenant" - Oscar winner Alejandro G. Iñárritu directed this fascinating and harrowing adaptation of Michael Punke's 2003 novel about mountain man Hugh Glass' struggles to survive a bear attack after being left for dead by two fellow trappers in the 1820s. Oscar winner Leonardo DiCaprio and Oscar nominee Tom Hardy starred.



3 - Vanity Fair 2004

4. "Vanity Fair" (2004) - I rather enjoyed this surprisingly first-rate adaptation of William Thackery Makepeace's 1848 novel about the rise, fall and rise of an ambitious early 19th century Englishwoman. Directed by Mira Nair, the movie starred Reese Witherspoon.



4 - The Deceivers

5. "The Deceivers" (1988) - Pierce Brosnan starred in this exciting adaptation of John Masters' 1952 novel about a British Army officer's discovery of the Thugee cult. Directed by Nicholas Meyer, the movie co-starred Saeed Jaffrey and Helena Michell.



5 - The Journey of August King

6. "The Journey of August King" (1995) - Jason Patric and Thandie Newton starred in this first-rate adaptation of John Ehle's 1971 novel about a North Carolina farmer, who unexpectedly finds himself helping a young slave escape from her master.



6 - Northanger Abbey

7. "Northanger Abbey" (2007) - Felicity Jones and J.J. Feild starred in this delightful adaptation of Jane Austen's 1817 novel about a young girl's misadventures during a visit to the resort town of Bath and at a family's mysterious estate. Jon Jones directed.



7 - Davy Crockett and the River Pirates

8. "Davy Crockett and the River Pirates" (1956) - Fess Parker and Buddy Ebsen starred in this superior sequel to the first Davy Crockett television movie about the adventures of the frontiersman and his friend George Russel along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers.



8 - Emma 1997

9. "Emma" (1996-97) - Kate Beckinsale and Mark Strong starred in this solid adaptation of Jane Austen's 1815 novel about the matchmaking efforts of a wealthy young woman in early 19th century England. The movie was adapted by Andrew Davies and directed by Diarmuid Lawrence.



9 - Brother Future

10. "Brother Future" (1991) - Phil Lewis starred in this entertaining historical/science-fiction movie about a Detroit teen who is hit by a car and wakes up to find himself a slave in 1822 Charleston. Directed by Roy Campanella II, the movie co-starred Carl Lumbly and Moses Gunn.

Friday, August 28, 2015

"THE THREE MUSKETEERS" (2011) Photo Gallery

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Below are images from "THE THREE MUSKETEERS", the 2011 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas père's 1844 novel. Produced and directed by Paul W.S. Anderson, the movie starred Matthew Macfadyen, Logan Lerman, Milla Jovovich, Ray Stevenson and Luke Evans: 


"THE THREE MUSKETEERS" (2011) Photo Gallery

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Thursday, August 27, 2015

"TERMINATOR: GENISYS" (2015) Review

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"TERMINATOR: GENISYS" (2015) Review

I have a confession to make. I am not a major fan of the "TERMINATOR" franchise. It has never been one of my favorite pop culture obsessions. In fact, I have never seen the "TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES" television series, aside from two or three episodes. But I have seen all of the franchise's movies, including its most recent one -"TERMINATOR: GENISYS"

Directed by Alan Taylor ("THOR: THE DARK WORLD"), "TERMINATOR: GENISYS" seemed to be some kind of attempt to reboot the franchise's main narrative. In other words, many fanboys believe that the 1991 film, "TERMINATOR 2: JUDGEMENT DAY" should have resolved the matter of whether Sarah and John Connor, along with the Terminator/T-800 (Model 101) cyborg, had permanently prevented Judgment Day (the date on which Skynet, an artificial intelligence general system, becomes self-aware and decides to exterminate mankind). In other words . . . there was no real need for the continuation of the franchise with 2004's "TERMINATOR: RISE OF THE MACHINE" and 2009's "TERMINATOR: SALVATION". This is due to the virulent dislike of the two movies by many fans. But what these fans had failed to take consider is that director James Cameron had failed to resolve the matter and allowed the John Connor character to exist in the 1991 movie's last reel. Producers David Ellison and Dana Goldberg must have realized this, along with screenwriters Laeta Kalogridis and Patrick Lussier. Or else there would have never been a movie like "TERMINATOR: GENISYS".

What this recent film did was pretty much reset the entire movie franchise - more or less. "TERMINATOR: GENISYS"began with Human Resistance leader John Connor launching a final offensive against Skynet in 2029. Before the Resistance can win the battle, Skynet sends a T-800 Terminator back to 1984 to kill John's mother, Sarah Connor. One of John's aides, Kyle Reese, volunteers to travel back in time to stop the Terminator and save Sarah. This sounds very familiar, does it not? Guess what? The plot is about to get tricky. While floating in the time machine magnetic field, Kyle spots another Resistance soldier attacking John. He also has visions of his younger self back in 2017.

Upon its arrival in 1984, the Skynet T-800 is disabled by Sarah and the Guardian, a reprogrammed T-800 sent back to protect her when she was nine years old. Kyle eventually arrives and is immediately attacked by a T-1000. Kyle, along with Sarah and the Guardian, destroy the T-1000 using acid. Sarah and the Guardian also reveal they have constructed a makeshift time machine similar to the one constructed by Skynet. Sarah plans to travel forward to 1997 – allegedly, the year Skynet becomes self-aware. Realizing the timeline has been altered, Kyle is convinced that the future has changed due to the warning he had received in his vision. He persuades Sarah to travel to 2017 with him in order to stop Skynet. But in that year, a surprise awaits the trio in the form of John Connor, who had been transformed into a Terminator by the physical embodiment of Skynet, the Resistance solider who had attacked him during Kyle's journey to the past.

I did like "TERMINATOR: GENISYS". Honestly, I did. But if I must be brutally frank, the movie's producers should have dragged the screenwriters out of bed and shot them for creating such a mucked up screenplay. I have not seen this many plot holes in a movie since 2009's "STAR TREK". It was a mess. First of all, Kalogridis and Lussier arrogantly ignored"TERMINATOR 3: RISE OF THE MACHINES" by originally stating that Judgment Day happened in 1997. It was supposed to happen two years after the setting for the second film (1995), but Sarah, John and the first Terminator guardian prevented this from happening in "TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAY". The screenwriters forgot this. They also forgot or ignored that Judgment Day actually happened in 2004. They also decided to ignore the fact that John was married to Kate Brewster by 2029. She was no where to be found. Although Kyle Reese originally did travel from 2029, the Resistance did not launch its final offensive against Skynet until 2032. And as a slap in the face against the fourth film,"TERMINATOR: SALVATION", the movie featured Kyle Reese as a boy between the ages of 10 to 13 or 14. In the 2009 film, Kyle was in his late teens - probably 17 years old . . . in 2018. I can only assume that the screenwriters (and possibly the producers) wanted to ignore what happened in the third and fourth films. And yet . . . they managed to ignore what happened at the end of the "highly acclaimed" second film, as well. To make matters even more confusing, John Connor was sporting a scar that he had acquired from a Terminator . . . in "TERMINATOR: SALVATION". Go figure.

Another matter in the script that I found confusing was the vision that Kyle had received from his childhood. How did he know that the warning about Genisys had something to do with Skynet . . . or that Genisys was the beginning form of Skynet? How did he know that they had to go back to the year 2017? To that exact year? And there is the matter of "the Guardian". I am speaking of the original Terminator T-800 who had been sent back to the 1970s to save and protect a very young Sarah Connor. This happens to be one of the movie's major plot twists, since it never happened in any of the previous four films. The problem is that the movie never revealed who had sent the T-800 back to the 1970s. And how did Sarah spend the rest of her childhood, being raised by an emotionless (back then) cyborg? This movie opened a new can of worms that demanded its own movie. 

In "TERMINATOR 2", the Myles Dyson character (creator of Skynet) was killed by members of a SWAT team in 1995, while he and the Connors were breaking into Cyberdyne. If Sarah and Kyle's time jump erased the events of"TERMINATOR 2", this would explain Miles Dyson's appearance in this film. Frankly, I wish he had stayed dead, because Courtney B. Vance, who portrayed Dyson, was literally wasted in this film. And the movie allowed Dyson's son Danny, who was portrayed by Dayo Okeniyi, to be the force behind Genisys. And if this time jump allowed Dyson to remain alive, it probably erased the events of the 2004 and 2009 movies . . . along with the events of the second half of "THE TERMINATOR". Which means . . . John Connor should have ceased to exist by the second half of "TERMINATOR: GENISYS". Some fans claim that John's father was the guy Sarah had been dating before she met Kyle in the 1984 movie. But . . . considering the change of events (namely Sarah spending the rest of her childhood, adolescence and early adulthood with the Guardian), I guess that never happened. And since she and Kyle time jumped before they could conceive John in that motel room . . . why did he still exist in the movie's second half?

By this time, one might be wondering why I liked this movie in the first place. Because I do like it. "TERMINATOR: GENISYS" was filled with some memorable moments. I could not help but smile at the re-creation of Kyle's journey from the early 21st century to 1984. I also found the details surrounding Sarah and Kyle's journey to 2017 also amusing. In theTERMINATOR universe, one has to strip naked before making a time jump. Watching Sarah and Kyle squirm with discomfort as they strip and prepare for their time jump, was quite enjoyable to watch. It seemed very obvious they were attracted to each other, yet seemed bent upon denying their attraction. This attraction between Sarah and Kyle proved to be one of my favorite aspects of "TERMINATOR: GENISYS". In fact, I found the interactions between Emilia Clarke and Jai Courtney more fun to watch than those between Linda Hamilton and Michael Biehn, who portrayed the same roles in the first film. It struck me as emotionally more complex and heated. And when the Guardian's character was thrown into the mix, the relationship between all three made this film very bearable and at times, rather fun. This was especially due to a surprisingly lively performance by Arnold Schwarzenegger. I might as well be frank. For me, the movie's highlight proved to be the relationship between the Guardian, Sarah Connor and Kyle Reese.

However, "TERMINATOR: GENISYS" had its share of some first-rate action sequences. I thought Alan Taylor did a well done re-creation of Kyle's original jump back into time. This became even more effective when the re-creation took a left turn with the appearance of a more militant Sarah and the Guardian. I also enjoyed the trio's encounter with the T-1000 (in the form of actor Lee Byung-hun) in 1984. And dealing with both the San Francisco Police in 2017 and the Terminator T-3000 (especially on the Golden Gate Bridge) proved to be quite exhilarating to watch.

I might as well be frank. "TERMINATOR: GENISYS" is not a perfect movie. I would not even regard it as a decent movie. It had too many plot holes for me to be comfortable with. And the movie struck me as an extremely clumsy way to reboot the franchise. As far as I am concerned the producers and screenwriters should have continued the franchise's narrative from where "TERMINATOR: SALVATION" left off. But thanks to some action sequences well shot by director Alan Taylor and the dynamic screen chemistry between Arnold Schwarzenegger, Emilia Clarke and Jai Courtney; I still managed to enjoy the film. Go figure.

Monday, August 24, 2015

Top Five Favorite Episodes of "BABYLON 5" (Season Four: "No Surrender, No Retreat")

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Below is a list of my top five (5) favorite episodes from Season Four (1996-1997) of "BABYLON 5". Created by J. Michael Straczynski, the series starred Bruce Boxleitner, Claudia Christian, Jerry Doyle and Mira Furlan: 


TOP FIVE FAVORITE EPISODES OF "BABYLON 5" (SEASON FOUR: "NO SURRENDER, NO RETREAT")

1- 4.15 No Surrender No Retreat

1. (4.15) "No Surrender, No Retreat" - Provoked by EarthForce President Clark's latest actions, former Captain John J. Sheridan leads the White Star fleet against EarthForce to liberate Proxima 3.



2 - 4.17 The Face of the Enemy

2. (4.17) "The Face of the Enemy" - Thanks to his new employer, CEO William Edgars, former Security Chief Michael Garibaldi is faced with the decision of whether or not to betray Sheridan to EarthForce. Babylon 5's Dr. Stephen Franklin and telepath Lyta Alexander arrive on Mars with a cargo of frozen telepaths for the final battles in the Earth Civil War.



3 - 4.05 The Long Night

3. (4.05) "The Long Night" - Sheridan make plans for the final strike against the Shadows and the Vorlons during the Shadow War. Meanwhile, Centauri Prime Ambassador Londo Mollari and his aide, Vir Cotto, make the final plans for assassinating Emperor Cartagia.



4 - 4.20 Endgame

4. (4.20) "Endgame" - Following his rescue by Garibaldi, Franklin and Lyta; Sheridan leads the final assault against President Clark's forces with the help of his rescuers and the Mars Resistance.



5 - 4.14 Moments of Transition

5. (4.14) "Moments of Transition" - During the last days of the Minbari Civil War, the Warrior Caste demands the surrender of Ambassador Delenn and the Religious Caste. Meanwhille, Psi cop Alfred Bester makes an offer to an increasingly desperate Lyta and Sheridan receives horrible news from Ivanova.



HM - 4.06 Into the Fire

Honorable Mention: (4.06) "Into the Fire" - Sheridan stages a final showdown between the Vorlons and the Shadows at Coriana 6 toward the end of the Shadow War.