Monday, October 5, 2015

"THE IMITATION GAME" (2014) Review




"THE IMITATION GAME" (2014) Review

One of the more critically acclaimed movies to hit the movie screens in 2014 was "THE IMITATION GAME", a loose adaptation of the 1983 biography, "Alan Turing: The Enigma". The movie focused upon the efforts of British cryptanalyst, Alan Turing, who decrypted German intelligence codes for the British government during World War II. 

I never saw "THE IMITATION GAME" while it was in the theaters during the winter of 2014-2015. After seeing it on DVD, I regret ever ignoring it in the first place. Then again, I was ignoring a good number of films during that year. I have been aware of two previous movies about the United Kingdom's Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park during World War II. But "THE IMITATION GAME" came closer to historical accuracy than the other two films. Is it completely accurate? No. There were a good deal of the usual complaints from historians and academics about the film's historical accuracy. But you know what? Unless I find such inaccuracy too ridiculous to swallow or it failed to serve the story, I honestly do not care.

I do have a complaint or two about "THE IMITATION GAME". The movie began with Turing being arrested by the police, because the arresting officer in question thought he was a Soviet spy. I found it odd that this Detective Nock had decided to question Turing on his own, instead of reporting the latter to MI-6. More bizarre is the fact that during interrogation, Turing told the police detective about his work, which should have been classified. 

And during my first viewing of "THE IMITATION GAME", I had assumed the film would be more about Turing's homosexuality than his role in breaking the Germans' Enigma code. After all, the movie began in 1951, when Turing was arrested for suspicion of espionage (due to his lack of a war record) and eventually charged for practicing homosexuality. But the movie focused a lot more on his work at Bletchley Park. His homosexuality did have some impact on the movie's narrative - Turing's memories of his schoolboy friendship with a boy named Christopher Morcom and his fears of his homosexuality being discovered. But the screenplay failed to explore the one potentially powerful aspect of his homosexuality in the story - namely his 1951 arrest and the chemical castration he underwent to avoid prison. Instead, the event was merely used as an epilogue for the movie and I found that rather disappointing.

Otherwise, I enjoyed "THE IMITATION GAME" very much. Screenwriter Graham Moore created an otherwise powerful look at Turing and his work at Bletchley Park. Moore took great care to explore the cryptanalyst's complex personality and its affect upon Turing's colleagues and his friend, Joan Clarke. I especially enjoyed Turing's friendship with Clarke and how she eventually helped him bond somewhat closer with his exasperated colleagues. Moore's screenplay also did an excellent job of exploring Turing's work at Bletchley Park in great detail. This exploration revealed something that took me completely by surprise - namely his creation of an electromechanical machine that helped break the Enigma code. Due to his work on this machine, Turing has become known as the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. Moore ended up winning a much deserved Best Adapted Screenplay for his work.

But not even a first-rate screenplay can guarantee a winning film. Fortunately for Graham Moore, Morten Tyldum signed up as the film's director. Who is Morten Tyldum? He is a Norwegian director who is highly acclaimed in his native country. And I thought he did a great job in transferring Moore's screenplay to the movie screen. It could have been easy for a movie like "THE IMITATION GAME", which featured a great deal of dialogue and hardly any action, to put me to sleep. Thankfully, Tyldum's direction was so well-paced and lively that he managed to maintain my attention to the very last reel. And I thought he juggled the occasional flashbacks to Turing's schooldays and the 1951 scenes featuring the latter's encounter with police Detective Nook with the World War II sequences very competently.

"THE IMITATION GAME" was also blessed with a first-rate cast. Benedict Cumberbatch earned a well-deserved Oscar nomination for his portrayal of the complex and brilliant Alan Turing. I really do not know what else to say about Cumberbatch's performance other than marvel at how he made a superficially unlikable character seem very likable and more importantly, vulnerable. Keira Knightly earned her second Academy Award for portraying Joan Clarke, Turing's closest friend and a brilliant cryptanalyst in her own right. One of Clarke's relatives complained that Knightley was too good looking to be portraying the rather plain Clarke. It seemed a pity that this person was more concerned with the actress' looks than her excellent and fierce portrayal of the intelligent Clarke, who proved to be a loyal friend of Turing's and at the same time, refused to put up with some of his flaky behavior toward her. 

The supporting cast included the likes of Matthew Goode, who gave a sharp and witty performance as cryptanalyst and analyst Hugh Alexander and Charles Dance as Commander Alastair Denniston, the the no-nonsense and unoriginal head of the codebreakers. It also featured solid performances from Allan Leech as John Cairncross, the soft-spoken codebreaker who proved to be a mole for the KGB; Rory Kinnear as Detective Nock, the inquisitive police inspector who learned about Turing's war activities; and Mark Strong, who gave a very cool performance as Stewart Menzies, head of MI-6 between 1939 and 1952.

Yes, "THE IMITATION GAME" had its flaws. I feel that the film's flaws came from the 1951 sequences in which Alan Turing found himself arrested by the police. Otherwise, I really enjoyed screenwriter Graham Moore and director Morten Tyldum look into the life of the famous cryptanalyst. I also have to give credit to a cast led by a brilliant Benedict Cumberbatch and Keira Knightley for making this film not only enjoyable, but also fascinating.

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