Wednesday, February 18, 2015

"RUSH HOUR 3" (2007) Review




"RUSH HOUR 3" (2007) Review

Chris Tucker, Jackie Chan and director Brett Ratner reunite after six years to film the third installment in the "RUSH HOUR". In the end, the trio produce a silly, occasionally flawed yet very funny sequel. 

I did not harbor any expectations about this comedy. Why should I? It's a "RUSH HOUR" movie. Like its two predecessors, it was another comedic adventure featuring Hong Kong detective Chief Inspector Lee (Jackie Chan) and Los Angeles Police Detective James Carter (Chris Tucker). However, this movie starts with the assassination attempt of Lee's former mentor, now Ambassador Han (Tzi Ma) from the first film, in Los Angeles. It seems that Han and the World Criminal Court have concerned themselves with the growing threat of the Chinese Triads. Han announces that he has knowledge of the leadership behind the Triads. But before he can say anything further, he is shot by an assasin who turns out to be Lee's godbrother, Kenji (Hiroyuki Sanada). The latter manages to get away before Lee and Carter can capture him. The pair eventually learns from the Kung Fu master of Ambassador Han's now grown-up daughter - Soo Yung (Zhang Jingchu) that she, the Ambassador and French Ambassador Reynard (Max von Sydow)have all been targeted by the Triads. Their investigations also lead them to a Triad hideout disguised as a gambling club in Paris. With the help of an overeager Parisian cab driver named George (Yvan Attal) and a beautiful nightclub entertainer named Genevieve (NoĆ©mie Lenoir), Carter and Lee foil the plans of the Traids to keep their identities safe.

Like its two predecessors, "RUSH HOUR 3" is not perfect. The movie's beginning - which featured the assasination attempt and Carter's encounter with two L.A. socialites - seemed a bit lame in the humor department. In fact, the movie does not really pick up pace until the two partners find themselves at Soo Yung's kung fu academy, where they encounter a rather "tall" adversary and Carter engages in a hilarious rendition of the old Abbott and Costello "Who's on First?" routine. One last aspect of the movie bothered me . . . namely the Parisian cab driver, George. At first, I found Attal's performance very entertaining, as he conveyed the character's distaste for Americans. But after Carter managed to convince him to embrace all things American - including Seattle's finest coffee that he labeled "shit" - he became annoying. A bore. Not even his last minute rescue of Carter and Lee could change my mind about him.

But "RUSH HOUR 3" still possessed enough attributes that made it an entertaining movie. The fight sequences - especially the sword fight between Chan and Sanada - were excellent. Even Tucker managed to hold his own very well, for once. While Chan and Sanada were busy with their showdown, his character was engaged in fighting off four Triad minions. Many might consider this unrealistic, considering that Carter had barely been able to defend himself in the first movie. But the second movie conveyed that Carter had learned a few moves. And by the third movie, he had become an effective martial arts fighter. Aside from the movie's first ten to fifteen minutes, the humor seemed just as snappy and hilarious as it had been in the first two movies. And as usual, it was the gregarious Tucker who provided most of the laughs. But what I really enjoyed about "RUSH HOUR 3" was the colorful Parisian setting. No one felt more happy than I when the movie shifted from Los Angeles to Paris.

If you are seeking a comedy that provides a sharp and witty look at our society's ills, "RUSH HOUR 3" is not your movie. If you simply want a hilarious, yet silly movie with beautiful locations, I suggest you rush to the nearest theater that features this movie, turn off your brain and enjoy yourself. Trust me, you will.

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