Sunday, May 18, 2014

"STAR WARS: EPISODE II - ATTACK OF THE CLONES" (2002) Review

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"STAR WARS: EPISODE II - ATTACK OF THE CLONES" (2002) Review

The fandom surrounding the 2002 movie, "STAR WARS: EPISODE II - ATTACK OF THE CLONES" has always struck me as somewhat a fickle affair. When the movie first hit the theaters over eleven years ago, many critics and film fans had declared the movie a major improvement over its predecessor, 1999's "STAR WARS: EPISODE I - THE PHANTOM MENACE". Some even went out of their way to declare it as the second best STAR WARS movie ever made. Another three to five years passed before the critics and fans' judgement went through a complete reversal. Now, the movie is considered one of the worst, if not the worst film in the franchise. 

Well, I am not going to examine what led to this reversal of opinion regarding "ATTACK OF THE CLONES". Instead, I am going to reveal my own opinion of the movie. Before I do, here is the plot. Set ten (10) years after "THE PHANTOM MENACE""ATTACK OF THE CLONES" begins with the Republic on the brink of a civil war, thanks to a former Jedi Master named Count Dooku. Disgruntled by the growing corruption of the Galactic Senate and the Jedi Order's complacency, Dooku has formed a group of disgruntled planetary systems called the Separatists. the Galactic Senate is debating a plan to create an army for the Republic to assist the Jedi against the Separatist threat. Senator Padmé Amidala, the former queen of Naboo, returns to Coruscant to vote on a Senate proposal to create an army for the Republic. However, upon her arrival, she barely escapes an assassination attempt. 

The Jedi Order, with the agreement of Chancellor Palpatine and the Senate, assigns Jedi Knight Obi-Wan Kenobi and his padawan (apprentice) of ten years, Anakin Skywalker, to guard Padmé. A contracted assassin named Zam Wessell makes another attempt on Padmé, but is foiled by Obi-Wan and Anakin. They chase her to a Coruscant nightclub, where they capture her. During their interrogation of Wessell, she is killed by her employer with a poisonous dart. The Jedi Council orders Obi-Wan to investigate the assassination attempt and learn the identity of Wessell's employer. The Council also assigns Anakin as Padmé's personal escort, and accompany her back to her home planet of Naboo. Obi-Wan's investigation leads to a cloning facility on the planet of Kamino, where an army of clones are being manufactured for the Republic and Zam Wessell's employer, a bounty hunter named Jango Fett. Not long after their arrival on Naboo, Anakin and Padmé become romantically involved, while aware of the former's status as a member of the Jedi Order.

I could discuss the aspects of "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" that seem to repel a good number of fans. But that would take a separate article and I am not in the mood to tackle it. There were some aspects that I personally found questionable. One of those aspects was the handling of the character Jedi Master Sifo-Dyas. When Kamino Prime Minister Lama Su had informed Obi-Wan that a Sifo-Dyas had ordered a clone army for the Republic, I assumed that Count Dooku had impersonated his former colleague, following the latter's death. It seemed so simple to me. Yet, a novel called "Labyrinth of Evil" revealed that the Jedi Master had been tricked into ordering the army by Chancellor Palpatine before being murdered by Dooku. Now, I realize that I am actually criticizing the plot of a novel, instead of "ATTACK OF THE CLONES", but every time I watch this movie, I find myself wishing that Dooku had ordered the clone army, while impersonating Sifo-Dyas. But I do have a few genuine complaints. Physically, Daniel Logan made an impressive young Boba Fett. However, it was pretty easy for me to see that the kid was no actor. Oh well. I also wish that Lucas and screenwriter Jonathan Hales had proved a longer scene to establish the antipathy that seemed to be pretty obvious between Anakin Skywalker and his stepbrother, Owen Lars. Instead, their scenes together merely featured some low-key dialogue and plenty of attitude from both Hayden Christensen and Joel Edgerton. Oh well. And if I must be honest, Count Dooku's lightsaber duel against Obi-Wan and Anakin on Geonosis proved to be rather lackluster and short.

Many fans have complained about the love confession scene between Anakin and Padmé at the latter's Naboo lakeside villa. Although, I have a problem with the scene, as well; my complaint is different. Many believed that the scene made Anakin look like a sexual stalker. Frankly, I have no idea how they came to that conclusion. It seemed obvious to me that Lucas had based the Anakin/Padmé romance on something called courtly love. However, it was also obvious to me that Christensen seemed incapable of dealing with the flowery language featured in courtly love. I am not stating that he is a bad actor. There were many scenes in "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" that made it clear to me that he is a first-rate actor. But . . . the movie was shot when he was 19 years old. It is obvious that he was too young to handle such flowery dialogue. He was not the first. I still have memories of Keira Knightley and James McAvoy's questionable attempts at the fast dialogue style from movies of the 1930s and 40 featured in the 2007 movie, "ATONEMENT". Like Christensen before them, they were too young to successfully deal with an unfamiliar dialogue style.

Despite the above flaws, "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" remains one of my top two favorite STAR WARS movies of all time. Why? One, I love the story. Many fans do not. I do. It has an epic scale that some of the other movies in the franchise, save for "STAR WARS: EPISODE V - THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK", seemed to lack. And I feel that Lucas and Hales did an excellent job of allowing the story to flow from a simple political assassination attempt to the outbreak of a major galactic civil war. During this 142 minute film, the movie also featured some outstanding action, romance between two young and inexperienced people, a mystery that developed into a potential political scandal, family tragedy that proved to have a major consequence in the next film and war. The best aspect of "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" - at least for me - were the complex issues that added to the eventual downfalls of the major characters.

Naturally, Lucas provided some outstanding action sequences in the movie. I mean . . . they really were. I would be hard pressed to select my favorite action scene from the following list:

*Coruscant chase scene
*Obi-Wan vs. Jango Fett fight scene on Kamino
*Obi-Wan tracks the Fetts to Geonosis
*Anakin's search for the kidnapped Shmi Skywalker on Tatooine
*Anakin and Padmé's arrival on Geonosis
*The Geonosis arena fight sequence
*The outbreak of the Clones War


Earlier, I had complained about Obi-Wan and Anakin's lackluster duel against Count Dooku. But . . . Dooku's duel against Jedi Master Yoda more than made up for the first duel. I thought it was an outstanding action sequence that beautifully blended the moves of both CGI Yoda figure and actor Christopher Lee's action double. More importantly, this duel between a Jedi Master and his former padawan beautifully foreshadowed the conflict between another master/padawan team in the following movie.

However, "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" was not simply an action film with little narrative. It had its share of excellent dramatic moments. Among my favorites are Anakin and Obi-Wan's rather tense quarrel over the Jedi mandate regarding Padmé's protection; Chancellor Palpatine's pep talk to Anakin before the latter's departure from Coruscant; Anakin and Padmé's conversation about love and the Jedi mandate; Obi-Wan's conversations with diner owner Dexter "Dex" Jettster, Count Dooku and especially his tense encounter with Jango Fett; Jedi Masters Yoda and Mace Windu's conversation about the Clone Army; and finally Anakin and Padmé's poignant declaration of love. But if I had to choose the best dramatic scene, it would Anakin's final conversation with his dying mother, Shmi Skywalker. Not only was the scene filled with pathos, drama and tragedy; both Christensen and actress Pernilla August gave superb performances in it. Many fans have complained about the Anakin/Padmé romance in the film. I suspect a good number of them have a problem with Padmé falling in love with a future Sith Lord, especially after he had tearfully confessed to slaughtering the Tusken Raiders responsible for his mother's death. Perhaps they wanted a modern-style love story, similar to the one featured in the first trilogy. Or they had a problem with the love confession scene. Although I had a problem with the latter, I definitely did not have problem with the romance overall. One, I never believed it should be an exact replica of the main romance featured in the Original Trilogy. And two, it featured other scenes building up to the romance that I found more than satisfying - especially Anakin and Padmé's Naboo picnic and their declaration of love, while entering the Geonosis arena.

When talking about the acting in any STAR WARS movie, one has to consider the franchise's occasional, yet notorious forays into cheesy dialogue. And if I must be frank, I have yet to encounter one actor able to rise above the cheesiness. But despite the cheesy dialogue, the saga has provided some first-class performances. They were certainly on display in"ATTACK OF THE CLONES". Ewan McGregor became the saga's new leading actor following the promotion of his character, Obi-Wan Kenobi, to Jedi Knight. And he did an excellent job as the straight-laced knight who continued to be wary of his padawan of ten years. McGregor also handled his action scenes with the same amount of grace he handled his performance. Instead of a stoic monarch, Natalie Portman's Padmé Amidala has become a Senator for her home planet of Naboo. This has allowed Portman to portray her character with more force and vibrancy, much to my relief. And Padmé's romance in this film allowed Portman to inject a good deal of passion into her performance. Hayden Christensen took over the role of Jedi padawan Anakin Skywalker with a great deal of criticism. Much of the criticism against him came from two scenes - Anakin's confession of love for Padmé and a comment regarding a dislike of Tatooine's sandy terrain. I do not understand the criticism about the sand line, since I have no problems with it. I have already expressed my complaints about the love confession scene. But I still felt that Christensen did an excellent job in portraying a 19 year-old Anakin, who lacked any real experience in romance and at the same time, harbored frustration and a good deal of angst regarding his Jedi master's tight leash upon him. And at the same time, the actor did an excellent job in conveying the more intimidating (and scary) side of his character.

"ATTACK OF THE CLONES" featured other first-rate or solid performances. Ayesha Dharker gave a solid performance laced with amusement as Padmé's successor as Naboo's ruler, Queen Jamillia. Ahmed Best returned as Gungan Jar Jar Binks, now Naboo's political representative for the Galactic Senate in a downsized role. Rose Byrne had a brief appearance as one of Padmé's handmaidens, Dormé. Frankly, I found Joel Edgerton and Bonnie Piesse's roles as Owen and Beru Lars equally brief. However, both Edgerton and Christensen still managed to convey some hostility between the two stepbrothers with very little dialogue. Jimmy Smits' performance as Prince/Senator Bail Organa of Alderaan, future stepfather of Princess Leia Organa, was brief, yet solid. 

The more impressive performances from Samuel L. Jackson, who was given a lot more to do in "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" - especially in the last third of the movie. And if there is one thing about Jackson, once a director gives him an inch, he will take it and give it his all. He certainly did in the Geonosis sequence. Christopher Lee made his first appearance in the STAR WARS as former Jedi Master Count Dooku. He was elegant, commanding and very memorable in the role. I could probably say the same about Temuera Morrison, who was marvelous as the bounty hunter, Jango Fett. This was especially in the Obi-Wan/Jango confrontation scene on Kamino. Both Kenny Baker and Anthony Daniels returned to portray droids R2-D2 and C3PO. Baker did a good job, as usual. But Daniels was really hilarious as finicky Threepio, who found himself in the middle of a battle with crazy results. And I will never forget his line - "Die Jedi dog! Die!" Pernilla August returned to portray Shmi Skywalker and probably gave one of the best performance in both the Prequel Trilogy and the saga overall. I found her portrayal beautiful and poignant. Both she and Christensen brought tears to my eyes. When I first saw "ATTACK OF THE CLONES", I was surprised to see Jack Thompson in the role of Cliegg Lars, Shmi's husband and Anakin's stepfather. I must say that he gave a wonderfully gruff, yet poignant performance. And finally, there was Ian McDiarmid. Oh God! He was just wonderful. It is a pity that his role only made brief appearances in the film. I really enjoyed the actor's take on his character's subtle manipulations of others.

Watching "ATTACK OF THE CLONES", it occurred to me that it was one of the most beautiful looking films in the franchise. Between David Tattersall's photography, Ben Burtt's editing, Gavin Bocquet's production designs and the art designs created by a team led by Peter Russell, my mind was blown on many occasions by the film's visual effects. I was especially impressed by the work featured in the Naboo scenes (filmed in Italy), the Coruscant sequences and especially those scenes set on the water-logged planet, Kamino. And yet, there is one scene that I always found memorable, whenever I watched the movie:

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But one cannot discuss a Prequel Trilogy movie without bringing up the name of costume designer Trisha Biggar. Her work in "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" - especially the costumes worn by Natalie Portman - blew the costumes she made for "THE PHANTOM MENACE" out of the water. For example:

Padme 6 

Padme 4 

Padme 1

The Hollywood movie industry should be ashamed of itself for its failure to honor this woman for her beautiful work. 

What else can I say about "ATTACK OF THE CLONES"? It is not perfect. I have never seen a STAR WARS movie that I would describe as perfect. But my recent viewing of this film has reminded me of how much I love it. Even after twelve years or so. To this day, I have George Lucas to thank, along with the talented cast and crew that contributed to this film. To this day, I view "ATTACK OF THE CLONES" as one of the two best films in the franchise.




2 comments:

Nessa said...

I think you'll be happy to know that Lucasfilm has made all novels part of its new Legends brand, meaning they're no longer canon or part of the main continuity. The only media that's canon in Star Wars are the movies and the Clone Wars cartoon.

I know the Clone Wars cartoon recently addressed the Sifo-Dyas situation; I don't know how, but Lucas was mostly responsible for the storylines in the series and he's known to ignore what the books do in favor of what he thinks should happen, so very possible Dooku killed and impersonated Sifo-Dyas to make the clone army.

But anyway, I'm with you. I loved the movie and I can't understand the complaints against it. The prequels have flaws, but all films have flaws, so why focus on the negative when I can be enjoying the positive! I loved Hayden as Anakin and thought he did a great job.

I don't even mind the cheesy dialogue. Well, most of the time. Sometimes, I find it awkward, but I don't outright hate it. I never really thought of Hayden being young and not being able to get the lines just right. That's a good point.

Still, it's good movie. It's not my overall favorite (that's Jedi), but I love all the films almost equally. I'm really hoping that the criticism of the movie fades eventually because I don't think the film deserves it.

Juanita's Journal said...

I think you'll be happy to know that Lucasfilm has made all novels part of its new Legends brand, meaning they're no longer canon or part of the main continuity. The only media that's canon in Star Wars are the movies and the Clone Wars cartoon.


I have to be honest . . . I never had a problem with the EU novels and comics. And considering that some of these novels and comics have very strong connections to the movies and TV series' plots, I cannot help but wonder if it was wise of Disney and the new Lucasfilm to declare all EU material as non-canon.