Thursday, January 31, 2013

"EVIL UNDER THE SUN" (2001) Screencaps Gallery

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Below are images from "EVIL UNDER THE SUN", the 2001 adaptation of Agatha Christie's 1941 novel. The movie starred David Suchet as Hercule Poirot: 


"EVIL UNDER THE SUN" (2001) Screencaps Gallery

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

"STAR WARS: EPISODE IV - A NEW HOPE" (1977) Review




"STAR WARS: EPISODE IV - A NEW HOPE" (1977) Review

Long ago (thirty-five years and eight months, to be exact) and in a galaxy far, far away, producer-director-writer George Lucas made film history with the release of his movie, "STAR WARS: EPISODE IV - A NEW HOPE". Only, during the summer of 1977, it was simply known as "STAR WARS". And this science-fiction/fantasy homage to Saturday morning serials and mythology was something that moviegoers had never seen before. 

Now considered as the fourth film installment of Lucas' STAR WARS saga, "A NEW HOPE" chronicled the adventures of a space-aged farmboy named Luke Skywalker, who finds himself swept up in a galactic conflict between a tyrannical empire and a band of rebel fighters determined to return freedom to the galaxy. Not only did the film introduced the concept of the summer blockbuster and created a movie/television/literary franchise that made billions for its creator, it also became the second highest grossing film in Hollywood history (as of 2012) and ushered in a new age for movie special effects. This movie has made such a major impact upon Hollywood that its effects are still being felt to this day.

"A NEW HOPE" began with an opening crawl describing a galaxy in a state of civil war. Spies for the Rebel Alliance have stolen the plans for the Galactic Empire's new weapon - a heavily armed and armored space station capable of destroying an entire planet called the Death Star. One of the Rebel Alliance leaders, Princess Leia Organa of Alderaan, is in possession of the Death Star plans when her ship is attacked by Imperial forces under the leadership of the Sith Lord Darth Vader. Before she could be captured, Princess Leia hides the plans and a holographic recording into the memory of an astromech droid called R2-D2. The small droid and its companion, a protocol droid named C-3PO flee to the surface of the desert planet Tatooine. While Darth Vader sends a contingent of stormtroopers to look for the droids, R2 and 3PO find themselves captured by Jawa traders, who sell them to a moisture farmer and his nephew named Owen Lars and Luke Skywalker.

Luke, who is an orphan, yearns to leave his uncle's farm and find adventure in the stars. He finds it when he releases Princess Leia's holographic recording, while cleaning R2-D2. The recording is for a man named Obi-Wan Kenobi. Surmising that Obi-Wan Kenobi and Ben Kenobi, who is a neighbor of his Uncle Owen, are one and the same; Luke delivers the droids and the message to the aging hermit. The young man also discovers that Kenobi is a former Jedi Master, who knew his father Anakin Skywalker, who used to be a Jedi Knight. Obi-Wan suggests that Luke help him deliver the Death Star plans to Princess Leia's father on Alderaan. At first, Luke rejects the offer. But when his Uncle Owen and Aunt Beru are found murdered by Imperial stormtroopers looking for the droids, Luke decides to join Obi-Wan on the latter's new adventure. They recruit the services of two smugglers - Han Solo and Chewbacca - to convey them to Alderaan. The journey proves to be a new beginning not only for Luke, but also his new companions.

I have a confession to make. When I first saw "A NEW HOPE" during the summer of 1977, I did not like it at all. Looking back, I realize that my hostile feelings toward the movie stemmed from a sense of being overwhelmed by something I found mind blowing and completely new. The release of "THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK" and "RETURN OF THE JEDI" eventually eased the impact of Lucas' saga upon my psyche. But it took several years for me to first warm up and eventually embrace "A NEW HOPE". Despite my eventual love for the movie, I have never viewed it as my favorite of the saga (so far) . . . or as one of my top favorites. But I can honestly say that after thirty-five years, it still has quite a punch. In fact, I believe that it is probably the most entertaining of the six STAR WARS films produced by George Lucas.

It is easy to see why "A NEW HOPE" is so beloved by many fans of the saga. The plot, written by Lucas, has the hallmarks of a first-rate adventure filled with space battles, escapes, daring-dos, a lightsaber duel, snarky dialogue, a roguish smuggler, a villain in black, a royal damsel-in-distress (who becomes a protagonist herself), a wise mentor and an innocent boy who answers the call to adventure. I suspect that another major reason why "A NEW HOPE" is so appealing to many of the saga's fans is the"good-vs-evil" aspect of both its tale and its characters. It must have been very easy for moviegoers to identify with the movie's protagonists and their fight against the tyranny of the "evil" Empire. For me, the movie's pièce de résistance proved to be the entire sequence aboard the Empire's Death Star. From the moment the heroes' ship the Millennium Falcon found itself forced into the depths of the large battle station, to the moment when they escape some 20 to 30 minutes later, the entire Death Star sequence seemed to be one major fun fest that crackled with humor and action.

With the exceptions of Alec Guinness and Peter Cushing, the cast of "A NEW HOPE" was filled with unknowns. I do not recall any well-known movie that Mark Hamill had appeared in before he became famous as Luke Skywalker. But Carrie Fisher, who portrayed the sharp-tongued Princess Leia, had already appeared in 1975's "SHAMPOO". And Harrison Ford, who would become a bigger star than either of his co-stars, had worked for Lucas before in the latter's 1973 classic, "AMERICAN GRAFFITI". But all three actors created an excellent screen team. Actors such as Peter Mayhew, who portrayed Han Solo's first mate Chewbacca; along with Anthony Daniels and Kenny Baker, who appeared in all six movies as the droids C-3PO and R2-D2; added their magic to the mix. Many people have made a big deal over David Prowse's physical and James Earl Jones' vocal portrayals of Sith Lord Darth Vader. And they were quite right to do so. Both actors contributed a great deal to the character. But I have rarely come across any comments about Peter Cushing's performance as the cold-blooded and arrogant military commander of the Death Star, Grand Moff Tarkin. I find that a shame, because I thought he made a very effective villain . . . even more so than Vader. And of course, there is Alec Guinness, who portrayed Obi-Wan Kenobi. Guinness earned an Academy Award for his portrayal of the iconic Jedi Master. And I believe it was well earned. He did an excellent job as Luke's wise and patient mentor, who was haunted not only by his past, but past deeds.

I was not kidding when I had stated that "A NEW HOPE" was not one of my top favorite STAR WARS movies. I believe that it has its flaws. While I found the movie's innocent air and joie de vivre approach to its story very appealing, I feel that the movie lacked a complexity that I believe gave an edge to the other five movies. I am not stating that the story and its characters lacked an emotional depth. There is some depth to both the story and the characters. But aside from the Han Solo character, the other characters seemed to be a bit one-dimensional in comparison. They were either good or evil. I can even say this about the Darth Vader character, who was given an opportunity for a bit of complexity in a scene in which he tried to explain the Force to the Death Star's senior officers staff. While there are many who have no problems with a lack of moral ambiguity, I do. And I have to say that I was more than relieved when Lucas finally injected some moral ambiguity into his characters, in the franchise's later films. 

If there is one movie that initiated my dislike of Tatooine, it is "A NEW HOPE". From the moment the camera focused upon 3PO and R2 trekking across the planet's desert, I found myself struggling to maintain my interest on the movie. It is possible that Tatooine has a talent for putting me to sleep. Only something really exciting has to happen - like Luke and Obi-Wan's first meeting with Han Solo and Chewbacca, along with their subsequent escape from the planet - could keep my interest sharply focused. I also have to admit that I am not a fan of the Battle of Yavin sequence that marked the destruction of the Death Star. It smacked too much of a World War II aerial dog fight, straight out of a 1940s movie. Speaking of that particular decade, I was not that impressed by Harrison Ford's attempt to sound like a 40s tough guy, during Han's argument with Leia following the escape from the Death Star in the following scene:

LEIA: That doesn't sound too hard. Besides, they let us go. It's the
only explanation for the ease of our escape.

HAN: Easy...you call that easy?

LEIA: Their tracking us!

HAN: Not this ship, sister.

Frustrated, Leia shakes her head.

LEIA: At least the information in Artoo is still intact.

HAN: What's so important? What's he carrying?

LEIA: The technical readouts of that battle station. I only hope that
when the data is analyzed, a weakness can be found. It's not over yet!

HAN: It is for me, sister! Look, I ain't in this for your revolution,
and I'm not in it for you, Princess. I expect to be well paid. I'm in
it for the money!


I know, I know. It does not seem like much. But hearing Ford spew those lines still make me wince after so many years. I was also disappointed by how Lucas handled the Princess Leia character in this film. I can already see heads spinning over this complaint. Superficially, Leia seemed like the perfect embodiment of a fictional female character of the late 20th century. Her intelligence, courage and razor-sharp wit practically screamed "I am woman, hear me roar!" And yet . . . Lucas dropped the ball with her character in one very significant moment in the film. His screenplay never revealed Leia's reaction to Tarkin's use of the Death Star to destroy her home planet, Alderaan. Not once. The moment Alderaan blew to smithereens, the movie cut back to the occupants of the Millennium Falcon and Obi-Wan's reaction. Audiences saw Leia's reaction to Tarkin's order to destroy the planet. But we never saw the aftermath. We never saw Leia mourn over the deaths of millions of Alderaaneans - including her parents. Instead, Lucas allowed audiences a look at Luke's reaction and grief over Obi-Wan Kenobi's death at the hands of Lord Vader. Even worse, Leia seemed so focused over comforting Luke that she seemed to have forgotten about Alderaan's destruction.

The production values for "A NEW HOPE" still holds up today after so many years. However, I suspect that one can attribute this to Lucas' decision to utilize CGI to make the special effects for the 1977 movie and the other two from the Original Trilogy more effective and less dated. I realize there are many veteran fans of the saga who claim that Lucas' CGI retouches were unnecessary. They have also expressed their dislike of the revamped movies. All I can say is that they are entitled to their opinions. I simply do not share them. However, John Williams' score remains as stirring and iconic as ever. John Mollo did an excellent job for his simple and elegant designs for the movie's costumes. However, I am a little peeved that he managed to snag an Academy Award for his work on this film; whereas the Motion Picture Academy failed to give Trisha Biggar even a nomination for her outstanding work in the Prequel Trilogy.

In conclusion, I can happily state that STAR WARS: EPISODE IV - A NEW HOPE" stands up very well after thirty-five years. The movie and the five other films of the STAR WARS franchise remain among the best adventure films ever made in Hollywood, as far as I am concerned. And I can only wonder if George Lucas and 20th Century Fox Studios ever released what it had unleashed upon the world when the movie was first released in theaters back in May 1977.




Tuesday, January 29, 2013

"LOST" RETROSPECT: (4.01) "The Beginning of the End"




"LOST" RETROSPECT: (4.01) "The Beginning of the End"

Looking back on six seasons of "LOST", it occurred to me that my opinion of the series' season premieres have been decidedly mixed. I have enjoyed at least two of them. I have found two of them mildly entertaining. And the last two have struck me as somewhat unmemorable.

The Season Four season premiere, (4.01) "The Beginning of the End", served as a follow-up to the superb Season Three finale, (3.22-3.23) "Through the Looking Glass". In that episode, the Oceanic 815 castaways had managed to contact a freighter called the Kahana that recently appeared offshore the island. Its first passenger, one Naomi Dorrit, was killed by castaway John Locke in an effort to prevent her from making that contact. His actions proved to be in vain, thanks to the determination of castaways' leader Jack Shephard and the efforts of Charlie Pace, who died after switching off a device that blocked the island's communication transmissions inside an old underwater station. The finale also featured the Others' failure to kidnap some of the female castaways for fertility tests. Their failure ended in death by the hands of Sayid Jarrah, Jin Kwon, Bernard Nadler, Hugo "Hurley" Reyes and James "Sawyer" Ford.

More importantly, "Through the Looking Glass" established the use of flash forwards to allow viewers glimpses into the lives of those castaways who would end up leaving the island by the end of Season Four. Jack's future off-island life - one of substance abuse, a suicide attempt and despair - was featured in that episode. It also established that fellow castaway Kate Austen also made it off the island. "The Beginning of the End" featured scenes of Hurley's post-island life.

When he experienced a vision of the now dead Charlie at a Los Angeles convenience store, Hurley flipped out and found himself being pursued by the Los Angeles Police in a car chase. The police detective who interrogated him following his arrest proved to be Mike Walton, the former partner of the late castaway Ana-Lucia Cortez. Upset over the idea of another connection to the island, Hurley pretended he never knew Ana-Lucia. He also immediately accepted Detective Walton's suggestion that he be placed inside a mental home. There, Hurley receives another visit from Charlie's ghost, who reminds him that he has to return to the island. Hurley later receives a visit from Jack, informing the latter about Charlie's ghost. He also apologizes to Jack for abandoning his leadership in favor of Locke . . . and points out the latter had been right about the threat from the freighter.

Hurley's words to Jack in the flash forward not only set the tone of how "The Beginning of the End" and the rest of Season Four unfolded. Before any of the castaways met with other passengers from the Kahana, they dealt with the news of Charlie's death, his discovery of Naomi's lies about the freighter and their rescue; and more importantly, the on-going conflict between Jack and Locke. All three crises resulted in a break-up of the Oceanic 815 survivors. Those determined to believe that the freighter's crew and other passengers will rescue them, stayed with Jack on the beach. And those who took Charlie's last message to heart, joined Locke on a trek to the Others' abandoned compound . . . including the Others' leader, Ben Linus.

"The Beginning of the End" ranks as one of my favorite "LOST" premieres. Thanks to Jack Bender's direction and a first-rate script written by Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse; the episode did a great job in setting the tone for the rest of Season Four and the second half of the series. It also marked the first of many times that the castaways would be divided - a situation that last will last until late Season Six. The title struck me as very relevant and an apt description of the beginning of the series' second half.

The ugliness conveyed by some of the characters in "Through the Looking Glass" continued in this episode. The groups from the beach and near the tower reunited near the Oceanic 815 cockpit section. And another ugly conflict flared up. The moment Jack clapped eyes on Locke, he lost his temper and attacked. Even worse, he tried to murder the older man, but his revolver lacked the bullets to complete the job. I suspect that Jack and some of the castaways believed he was justified in his attempt to kill Locke. After all, the latter had murdered Naomi Dorrit with a machete in the back. I suspect that Jack was simply angry at Locke for nearly preventing any kind of rescue from those aboard the Kahana. Hell, Jack had been angry at Locke for a long time and for many things. Naomi's death proved to be the last straw. I suspect that Jack's attempt to murder Locke had been sprung from his own selfishness and desire for revenge . . . the very same emotions that led Sawyer to murder Tom Friendly in cold blood in "Through the Looking Glass".

Most of the castaways may have shared Jack's feelings. Before Naomi died, Kate informed her that Locke was crazy and that all of the castaways hated him. Her comments about Locke struck me as slightly infantile, if I must be honest. It occurred to me that Kate may have harbored a strong dislike or hatred toward Locke longer than anyone - including Jack. And Sayid continued to question Locke about the latter's destruction of the Others' submarine in (3.13) "The Man From Tallahassee". Even Rose Nadler, who wanted to remain on the island to maintain her health, expressed disgust at Locke's murder of Naomi . . . after witnessing Jack's own murder attempt. I found Rose's judgment of Locke rather ugly and even worse, hypocritical.

Unfortunately for Jack, Hurley turned out to be the one who pulled the rug from underneath him. Recalling Charlie's sacrifice and dire warning, he loudly declared his decision to follow Locke. Claire, Ben, Sawyer (much to Kate's distress), Danielle Rousseau, her daughter Alex, a young Other named Karl and several other Oceanic 815 castaways did the same. I found this scene brimming with first-rate performances and great drama that still impresses me after nearly four years. The episode ended with another dramatic moment - Jack and Kate's meeting with Daniel Farraday, the first of four new main characters introduced to the series.

I believe that Jorge Garcia is a first-rate actor who has always managed to handle both comedy and drama with great ease. This seemed especially apparent in scenes that featured Desmond Hume's revelation about Charlie's death and Hurley's decision to join Locke to Otherville. Mind you, I have never been a major fan of the Hurley Reyes character. I found his man-child persona a little difficult to stomach at times. But I cannot deny that I found Garcia's performance to be outstanding. I can also say the same about Matthew Fox and Terry O'Quinn, who both continued their superb work in a tense-filled scene between Jack and Locke. The episode also featured brief, yet memorable moments from Michael Emerson, L. Scott Caldwell, Emilie de Ravin and Lance Reddick, who made his introduction as the wonderfully creepy Matthew Abbadon. I was also impressed by Michael Cudlitz, who gave a poignant performance as Ana-Lucia's former partner. And Marsha Thomason, who has never impressed me in the past, certainly did as the dying Naomi Dorrit.

The quality of the season premieres for "LOST" has always been a mixed bag for me. I could say the same about the series, overall. But I cannot deny that Jack Bender's direction, along with Lindelof and Cuse's script and a great performance by Jorge Garcia; "The Beginning of the End" struck me as one of the better season premieres.

Sunday, January 27, 2013

"GANGSTER SQUAD" (2013) Photo Gallery


Below are images from the new crime drama called "GANGSTER SQUAD". Directed by Ruben Fleischer, the movie stars Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone and Sean Penn:



"GANGSTER SQUAD" (2013) Photo Gallery

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Saturday, January 26, 2013

"DJANGO UNCHAINED" (2012) Review



"DJANGO UNCHAINED" (2012) Review

Over three years following the release of his 2009 movie, "INGLORIOUS BASTERDS", Quentin Tarantino courted success and controversy with a new tale set the past. Called "DJANGO UNCHAINED", this new movie combined the elements of the Old West and Old South and told the story about a recently freed slave-turned-bounty hunter in search of his still enslaved wife. 

The movie begins with a gang of male slaves being transported across Texas by a group of slavers called the Speck brothers. The group encounter Dr. King Schultz, a German-born dentist, who also happens to be a bounty hunter. Schultz offers to purchase Django, whom he believes can identify a trio of murderous siblings called the Brittle brothers, who had worked as overseers for Django's previous owner. The Specks become hostile and Schultz kills one of the brothers. He then frees Django and leaves the wounded brother behind to be killed by the newly freed slaves. Django and Schultz come to an agreement in which the latter will give the former freedom, a horse and $75 for helping him identify the Brittle brothers. Once the pair achieve their goal at a Tennessee plantation owned by one Spencer "Big Daddy" Bennett, Schultz takes on Django as his associate and over the winter, collect a number of bounties. In the following spring, Schultz offers to help Django track down the latter's wife, Broomhilda von Shaft. They discover that she is owned by a brutal, yet charming Mississippi planter named Calvin Candie. The pair realize that in order to rescue Broomhilda, they would have to pose as potential buyers of a fighter slave in order to secure an invitation at Candie's plantation called Candyland.

Even before its initial release in movie theaters in late December, "DJANGO UNCHAINED" managed to attract a good deal of controversy. Producer/director Spike Lee declared the movie as an insult to his ancestors in a magazine article and his refusal to see it. Others have criticized the film for its violence and its use of the word "nigger". And some have criticized the movie for historical inaccuracy. They claimed that the practice of fighting Mandingo slaves never existed and that Tarantino depicted the Klu Klux Klan a decade before its actual existence. And Jeff Kuhner of The Washington Times complained that: "Anti-white bigotry has become embedded in our postmodern culture. Take Django Unchained. The movie boils down to one central theme: the white man as devil — a moral scourge who must be eradicated like a lethal virus."

Mind you, I have my own complaints about "DJANGO UNCHAINED". Actually, I have three complaints. One, I found the movie's chronological setting rather confusing. According to the movie's opening, it began in "1858 - Two years before the Civil War". Judging by the weather, Django's first meeting with Schultz in Texas occurred in the fall. Which probably means that the movie began two-and-a-half years before the Civil War, not two years. Yes, I am being anal about this. However, Django and Schultz accompanied Candie to Candyland in early May 1858 . . . at least according to a scene that featured Candie's head slave Stephen writing out a check for supplies. It is quite obvious that Tarantino got his time frame a little off. Was "DJANGO UNCHAINED" set between the fall of 1858 and the spring of 1859? Or was it set between the fall of 1857 and the spring of 1858? Only Tarantino cananswer this. I also found the character of Broomhilda von Shaft slightly underdeveloped. Some have claimed that her character is passive. I would disagree, considering she was introduced being punished for attempting to run away from Candyland. But aside from a scene or two, I feel that Tarantino could have done a little more with her character. And three, I have mixed feelings about Tarantino's use of flashbacks in this movie. Some of the flashbacks were well utilized - including those featuring Django's memories of Broomhilda being whipped and branded as a runaway, Schultz's trauma over witnessing the mutilation of a Candie slave named D'Artagnan, and Big Daddy organizing a group of night riders to attack Django and Schultz. But some of the flashbacks seemed to go by so fast that I found their addition to the film unnecessary.

As for the other complaints about the movie, I do have a response. Spike Lee is entitled to his decision not to see the movie. However, I do find his willingness to condemn the movie without seeing it rather strange. Criticism of Tarantino's use of violence in his movies have become repetitive in my eyes. "DJANGO UNCHAINED" is a Quentin Tarantino movie. Can someone name one of his movies that did not feature any violence? Because I cannot. And his recent films do not strike me as violent as earlier films such as 1993's "RESERVOIR DOGS". Also, violence has played a part in many slave societies throughout history . . . including U.S. slavery. Yes, the Ku Klux Klan was first organized in the late 1860s, after the Civil War. But the Klan's origins came from patrol riders, who were recruited by planters in many Southern states to maintain vigilance of both slaves and free black in local rural neighborhoods. So, the idea of "Big Daddy" Bennett organizing a group of local riders to attack Django and Schultz is not implausible. 

In response to Jeff Kuhner's accusation of anti-white bigotry, Tarantino not only created the German-born Schultz, who helped Django attain freedom and find Broomhilda; but also a Western sheriff portrayed by television veteran Lee Horsley ("MATT HOUSTON" anyone?), who seemed very friendly to both the German immigrant and the former slave. Tarantino also created Candyland's head house slave, Stephen, who proved to be one of the film's worst villains. So much for Kuhner's accusation. A great deal of "DJANGO UNCHAINED" is set in the pre-Civil War South and its topic happens to be about American slavery. The use of "nigger" is historically accurate for the movie's setting. And I am surprised that no one has complained about the slur being used in Steven Spielberg's recent movie, "LINCOLN". Hell, the word is used throughout productions such as the two "ROOTS"miniseries, the three "NORTH AND SOUTH" miniseries, "QUEEN", the 1971 movie "SKIN GAME" and in a good number of other movie and television productions set in antebellum and Civil War America. Even the use of the slur in a production set in the 19th century North would be historically accurate. I also recall the use of racial slurs for whites in a few scenes. As for Tarantino's use of Mandingo fighting slaves in the movie . . . I have no explanation for its presence in this film. There is no historical evidence of this particular sport. And I suspect that Tarantino was simply inspired by the 1975 movie, "MANDINGO" and Kyle Onstott's 1957 novel upon which the latter was based.

So . . . how do I feel about "DJANGO UNCHAINED"? Frankly, I believe it is one of the best movies of 2012. And I also consider it to be another cinematic masterpiece by Quentin Tarantino. One of the aspects of "DJANGO UNCHAINED" was Tarantino's ability to take a rather dark topic like slavery and fashioned it into a explosive mixture of action, drama, suspense and some comedy. Many have complained that the movie should have been a straight drama, considering its topic. But I disagree. Yes, "DJANGO UNCHAINED" could have been an effective straight drama. But Tarantino decided to take a rare and unique route in unfolding his tale. And in doing so, he managed to fashioned a fascinating story that allowed me to experience an array of emotions that left me more than satisfied by the movie's last scene. 

"DJANGO UNCHAINED" was not the first time comedy was used to reveal one of the darkest episodes in this country's history. This has been done in "SKIN GAME" and in television shows such as "BEWITCHED" and the comedy sketch series, "KEY & PEELE". Tarantino used the same mixture of pathos, horror, drama and comedy for many of his past movies - especially in"INGLORIOUS BASTERDS". I found this use of humor especially effective in scenes that included the surviving Speck brother's attempt to convince the slaves freed by Schultz not to kill him. I never knew that James Russo, who portrayed the surviving Speck brother, could be so funny. Django and Schultz's little exchange regarding the former's identification of the Sprittle brothers struck me as funny. I could say the same about Stephen's reaction to Candie's treatment of Django as a house guest and Lara Lee Candie-Fitzwilly's (Candie's sister) futile attempts to attract Schultz's attention. But the funniest sequence has to be the flashback featuring "Big Daddy" Bennett's recruitment of night riders for an attack on Django and Schultz. In fact, that particular scene practically had me rolling with laughter. 

Some people have complained that "DJANGO UNCHAINED" is basically a revenge tale for African-Americans. I find this accusation rather odd, considering that Django's main objective was to find Broomhilda and get her out slavery by any means possible. And despite the movie's prevalent humor, Tarantino did not hold back in presenting not only the horrors and emotional traumas of slavery, but also racism. This was especially true in a handful of scenes in the movie. The opening scene featured an emotionally shell shocked Django being transported across Texas as part of a slave coffle. Other traumatic scenes include Candie's little speech on the inferiority of blacks, the erruption of violence at Candyland that resulted in Django hanging from a barn's roof, naked and bound and Stephen's maleovelent revelation of Django's fate as a slave for a Mississippi mining company. One horrifying scene that I found particularly brutal was a flashback featuring Broomhilda's brutal whipping at the hands of the Brittle brothers, while Django desperately tries to convince one of the brothers to spare her.

I really do not know what to say about the performances featured in the movie. I realize there are no Academy Award nominations for ensemble casts. If there were, I would nominate the cast of "DJANGO UNCHAINED". One, Tarantino cast old movie and television veterans in cameo roles. I have already mentioned Lee Horsley and James Russo. I also spotted the likes of Russ and Amber Tamblyn, Don Stroud, Tom Wopat, Cooper Huckabee, Robert Carradine, Michael Parks and a humorus special guest appearance by Franco Nero. Both Bruce Dern and M.C. Gainey (of "LOST") were especially scary in their brief appearances as Old Man Carrucan (Django and Broomhilda's former owner) and Big John Brittle. Both Dana Michelle Gourrier and Nichole Galicia gave solid performances as Cora and Sheba, Candie's housekeeper and concubine respectively. And Dennis Christopher's performance as Calvin Candie's obsequious attorney, Leonide Moguy, struck me as spot-on. 

Don Johnson provided a skillful combination of charm, menace and humor in his role as Spencer "Big Daddy" Bennett, the Tennessee planter who served as the Brittle brothers' current employer. Jonah Hill had a funny cameo as one of his night riders. I could say the same about Miriam F. Glover, who gave one of the movie's funniest lines, while portraying one of Big Daddy's house slaves. Ato Essandoh of A&E's "COPPER" was very effective as D'Artagnan, the frightened fighting slave whose runaway attempt led to his brutal death. Laura Cayouette's performance as Lara Lee Candie-Fitzwilly, Candie's widowed sister, struck me as effective. On one hand, I found her attempts to seduce Schultz rather funny. On the other hand, her outrage over Candie's attempt to display a naked Broomhilda during supper provided a great deal of tension in the scene. Walton Goggins gave a memorable and scary performance as one of Candie's henchmen, Billy Crash. James Remar got to portray two intimidating characters - Ace Speck and Candie's main henchman, Butch Pooch. And he did a damn good job with both roles. 

Although I had been critical of Tarantino's creation of the Broomhilda von Shaft, I must admit that Kerry Washington still managed to wring out a first-rate performance from the role. I especially impressed with her in scenes that featured Broomhilda's tense encounters with Stephen; and her subtle, yet pleased reaction to Schultz's purchase of her from Candie and her painful whipping by the Brittle brothers in one of the flashback. And I must admit that I found that last shot of her removing a shotgun from her saddle rather interesting. Perhaps after all that Broomhilda had endured, she was not taking any chances. I believe that the year 2012 will prove to be one of Samuel L. Jackson's best years professionally. Aside from portraying Nick Fury in the year's biggest hit, "THE AVENGERS"; he got to portray one of the most complex and villainous roles in "DJANGO UNCHAINED" as Candie's trusted and malevolent head house slave, Stephen. Watching the movie, I was struck at how much Stephen reminded me of the Mr. Carson character from the British television series, "DOWNTON ABBEY". Both characters possessed the same blinding loyalty, snobbery, jealousy over his position within the slave hierarchy, and anger toward anyone from their background who managed to rise higher than they (for example: Django). Jackson did a superb job in not only conveying Stephen's penchant for utilizing the old "Puttin' on Old Massa" routine publicly, but also his intelligence while in the private company of Django, Broomhilda or Candie. And by the way, the man has a nice singing voice. Many people have expressed surprise at Leonardo Di Caprio's portryal of the villanous, yet charsmatic Calvin Candie. I was not that surprised, considering I have seen him portray a villain before - as the cold-blooded Louis XIV in 1998's "THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK". But I do believe that Candie not only proved to be a more memorable villain, but also one of the actor's best roles ever. He was fantastic as the charming, yet brutal Candie . . . and at the same time rather contradictory. It was obvious that Di Caprio's Candie fervently believed in the superiority of whites; yet at the same time, he had no problems with allowing Stephen to handle the plantation's finances or accepting the elderly slave's intelligence and sharp observations about Django, Schultz and Broomhilda with very little reluctance.

Instead of portraying a villain, Christoph Waltz portrayed Django's friendly, yet ruthless mentor and partner; the German-born dentist-turned-bounty hunter, Dr. King Schultz. And he was fantastic. Waltz effectively portrayed Schultz's cold-blooded pursuit of wanted criminals for profit, yet at the same time; conveyed the character's disgust over the institution of slavery and open-mindedness toward Django, Broomhilda and other slaves. Waltz's best moments proved to be Schultz's encounter with the Speck brothers and Django in Texas, his taking down of the wanted Sheriff Bill Sharp (portrayed by Don Stroud), his reaction to D'Artagnan's mauling and the revelation of his disgust toward Candie. And Waltz proved to have great screen chemistry with Jamie Foxx. I believe that the latter's portrayal of the title character has proven to be vastly underrated by the majority of film critics and some moviegoers. I am a little disappointed, but not surprised. Django turned out to be a somewhat introverted character that was not inclined to speak very much . . . whether as a slave or a free man. Critics and filmgoers are not inclined to pay much attention to non-showy characters. Since Django proved to be a quiet character, Foxx resorted to good old-fashioned screen acting to convey most of the character's non-speaking moments. And he did a superb job in portraying Django's array of emotions - especially in the opening scene featuring the slave coffle in Texas, Schultz's killing of the criminal, his first view of Broomhilda at Candyland, and the confrontation with Candie during the latter's supper party. Ironically, another one of Foxx's best moments proved to be quite verbal in which he attempts to con a group of slavers for a mining company to take him back to Candyland in order to collect on a fake bounty. In the end, Foxx did a superb job in developing Django from a slave in shock over the traumatized separation from his wife to the soft-spoken, yet self-assured man who could be very ruthless when the situation demanded it.

I also have to say a word about the movie's behind-the-scene production. I was impressed by Sharen Davis' costume designs. She did a solid job in re-creating the fashions of the late antebellum period. However, I noticed a few oddball designs for Candie's slave mistress Sheba and a maid at a social club in Greenville, Mississippi; reflecting the planter's penchant for anything French. I suspect this was a visual joke on Tarantino's part. I was also impressed by J. Michael Riva's production designs and Leslie A. Pope's set decorations in the sequences for the Texas town featured in the movie's first 10 to 20 minutes, Candie's Napoleon Club in Greenville and especially the interiors for Candyland's mansion. Robert Richardson did an excellent in capturing the beauty of California, Louisiana and especially Wyoming with his photography. As he had done for "INGLORIOUS BASTERDS", Tarantino used already recorded music to serve as the score for his movie. I did notice that a few songs - especially one for the opening title sequence - seemed to have been written specifically for the movie. However, I do not know who may have written them.

It occurred to me that "DJANGO UNCHAINED" was Tarantino's second period piece in a row. And I found myself wondering if he planned to write and direct a third period movie as part of some kind of semi-historical trilogy. Whether he does or not, I must say that I was impressed with "DJANGO UNCHAINED". More than impressed. I believe it is one of the best movies I have seen released in 2012. And I feel that it is one of the writer-director's more original works, due to superb writing, direction and an excellent cast led by Jamie Foxx and Christoph Waltz.



P.S.  Check out this photo:





Ohmigod!  It's Crockett and Tubbs!