Monday, July 16, 2018

"DRAGONWYCK" (1946) Photo Gallery


Below are images from "DRAGONWYCK", the 1946 adaptation of Anya Seton's 1944 novel. Written and directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, the movie starred Gene Tierney and Vincent Prince: 


"DRAGONWYCK" (1946) Photo Gallery


















Sunday, July 15, 2018

Transformations in “AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.”


During my viewing of ABC's "AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.", I noticed that between Seasons One and Three, certain characters underwent a transformation or acquired powers through certain circumstances.   Of the four characters mentioned below, three of them were transformed, thanks to a mist from a crystal called Terrigen.  This led them to become Inhumans.  The fourth character had been transformed via science experiments conducted by the terrorist agency called HYDRA.  I also noticed that at least three characters also endured a serious physical transformation.  Here they are:


TRANSFORMATIONS IN "AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D."



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Mike Peterson - A civilian who had experienced a severe back injury on the job.  A group called the Centipede Project (which was controlled by HYDRA) recruited him to use their Centipede serum.  The latter acquired new superpowers, but it formula also affected his psyche.  The team of S.H.I.E.L.D. agents led by Phil Coulson, saved Petersen, when HYDRA turned on him.  After serving as a S.H.I.E.L.D. agent for a while, Peterson was captured by a team of HYDRA agents led by S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent John Garrett, who was betraying the latter.  Garrett and HYDRA transformed Peterson into the Cyborg known as Deathlok.


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Raina - A scientist who believed there were people in the world with the potential for special powers.  She also believed that she might be special, herself.  Due to this belief and her search, Raina was willing to work with HYDRA  Raina was eventually exposed to the Terrigen mist inside an abandoned Kree settlement discovered by Coulson, and transformed into an Inhuman.

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Dr. Andrew Garner - He was a neurologist and forensic psychologist who worked for S.H.I.E.L.D.  He was also married to S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Melinda May, until a traumatic event that she had experienced, led to their divorce.  Dr. Garner and May eventually reconciled and embarked upon a vacation together.  Upon their return, Coulson asked him to examine a book on the history of Inhumans, written by former Inhuman leader, Jiaying.  The book turned out to be a trap for any human, who was exposed by the Terrigen mist from a Terrigen crystal hidden inside it.  Instead of dying, Dr. Garner's latent  transformed into an Inhuman eventually named Lash.


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Daisy Johnson aka Skye - She was a talented hackvist who was born to future Inhuman leader Jiaying and American medical practitioner named Dr. Calvin Johnson in a Chinese village.  Not long after her birth, HYDRA agents raided the village and kidnapped her mother and a few village elders.  Dr. Johnson left baby Daisy in the hands of trusted villagers in order to find his wife.  S.H.I.E.L.D. agents investigating the massacre found Daisy and brought her back to the U.S.  After living in an orphanage and a series of foster homes, Daisy, who called herself Skye, became a hackvist who exposed the secrets of the U.S. government.  Phil Coulson's S.H.I.E.L.D. team eventually caught her and recruited her into the agency.  Over a year later, Daisy found herself inside the remnants of the Kree City with Raina.  She was exposed to the same Terrigen mist as Raina, and acquired new powers.  She eventually acquired the nickname, Quake.


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Of the four characters mentioned above, S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Daisy Johnson is the only one who did not endure a complete physical transformation.  She is also the only character who is not portrayed by an actor/actress of African descent.

So, could someone explain why three characters portrayed by actors/actresses of African descent had to undergo such drastic physical changes when they became enhanced beings, while the fourth character - someone NOT of African descent, only underwent a name change and haircut when she became an enhanced being?








Saturday, July 14, 2018

"THE POST" (2017) Review

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"THE POST" (2017) Review

When one thinks of Katharine GrahamBen Bradlee and The Washington Post; the Watergate scandal comes to mind. So, when I heard that filmmaker Steven Spielberg planned to do a movie about the famous newspaper's connection to the "Pentagon Papers" . . . I was very surprised. 

As many know, the Pentagon Papers had originated as a U.S. Department of Defense sponsored report that depicted the history of the United States' political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. Sometime between 1969 and 1971, former military/RAND Corporation strategic analyst Daniel Ellsberg and RAND colleague Anthony Russo secretly made several copies of classified documents about the U.S. involvement in Vietnam since 1945 and submitted them in 1971 to The New York Timescorrespondent, Neil Sheehan. The Times eventually published the first excerpts of the classified documents on June 13, 1971. For years, I have been aware of The New York Times's connection to the Pentagon Papers. I had no idea that The Washington Post had played a major role in its publication, as well.

There have been several productions and documentaries about the Pentagon Papers. However, most of those productions centered around Daniel Ellsberg or The New York Times's roles in the documents. "THE POST" marked the first time in which any production has depicted The Washington Post's role. Many people, including employees from The New York Times, have questioned Spielberg's decision to make a movie about The Post's connection to the Pentagon Papers. Some have accused Spielberg of giving credit for the documents' initial publication to the The Washington Post. And yet, the movie made it perfectly clear that The New York Times was the first newspaper to do so. It even went out of its way to convey Post editor-in-chief Ben Bradlee's frustration at The Times' journalistic coup. 

Following The New York Times's publication of the Pentagon Papers' first excerpts, the Nixon Administration, at the urging of Secretary of State Henry Kissenger, opposed the publication. Later, President Richard Nixon ordered Attorney General John Mitchell to obtain a Federal court injunction, forcing The Times to cease publication after three articles. While The New York Times prepared a legal battle with the Attorney General's office, Post assistant editor Ben Bagkikian tracks down Ellsberg as the source of the leak. Ellsberg provides Bagdikian with copies of the same material given to The Times, who turns them in to Bradlee. The movie's real drama ensues when the newspaper's owner, Katherine Graham, finds herself torn between Bradlee's urging to publish the documents and the newspaper's board of directors and attorneys, urging her not to.

I had at least two problems with "THE POST". I am certain that others had more problems, but I could only think of two. I had a problem with Janusz Kamiński's cinematography. I realize that the man is a legend in the Hollywood industry. And I have been more than impressed with some of his past work - many of it for Steven Spielberg's movies. But I did not like his photography in "THE POST". I disliked the film's grainy and slightly transparent photography. I do not know the reasons behind Spielberg and Kamiński's decision to shoot the movie in this style. I do know that I found it unappealing.

My second problem with the film centered around Spielberg's directorial style. In other words, his penchant for sentimentality nearly made the film's last ten minutes slightly hard for me to swallow. I refer to the scene in which one of the reporters read aloud the Supreme Court's decision to allow both The Washington Post and The New York Times, along with any other newspaper, to continue publishing the Pentagon Papers. It simply was not a matter of actress Carrie Coon reading the Court's decision out loud. Spielberg emphasized the profoundness of the moment with John Williams' maudlin score wailing in the background. A rather teeth clenching moment for me.

Otherwise, I enjoyed the movie very much. Superficially, "THE POST" did not seem that original to me. When one has seen the likes of "ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN" and "SPOTLIGHT", what is so different between them and "THE POST". But there was a difference. For the movie's real heart focused upon owner Katherine Graham and her conflict over whether or not to allow the next excerpts of the Pentagon Papers to be published. And what made this even more interesting is the woman's character.

If one had read Graham's memoir, "Personal History", one would learn that for years, she had suffered from an inferiority complex since childhood, due to her strained relationship with her more assertive mother. In fact, her father, who was the newspaper's original owner, had handed over the newspaper to her husband, Philip Graham, instead of her. And she saw nothing wrong with her father's decision. Following her husband's death, Graham found herself publisher of The Post. During the movie's setting - June 1971 - not only did Graham found herself dealing with Ben Bradlee's urgent demand that the newspaper publishes the Pentagon Papers, but also with the newspaper's stock market launch. Even worse, Graham also found herself facing a board of directors who did not take her seriously as The Post's publisher.

So in the end, "THE POST" was more than about the Papers itself and the question of the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War. It seemed to be about how an unpopular war had an indirect impact upon a woman's life through a political scandal. The movie also seemed to be about a struggle between the media's belief in free press in order to inform the people and the government's belief in its right to control what the people should know. In a way, the Vietnam War and Daniel Ellsberg's release of the Pentagon Papers established The Washington Post's rise as an important national newspaper. And it opened the public's eyes about the U.S. government's involvement in Vietnam - something that had been hidden from the government for over two decades. The war and Ellsberg also kick started Katherine Graham's elevation as a newspaper publisher willing to take a risk for an important news story and of her self-esteem. Spielberg's movie could have simply been about The New York Times's scoop with its publication of the first excerpts of the Pentagon Papers and its battle with the Nixon Administration. But as I have earlier pointed out, his narrative has been seen in past productions.

Aside from my disappointment with Kamiński's cinematography, there were other aspects of "THE POST" I admired. I certainly had no problems with Rick Carter's production designs. One, he did an admirable job of re-creating Washington D.C. and New York City circa 1971. And I was especially impressed that both Carter and set decorator Rena DeAngelo's recreation of The Washington Post's newsroom was as accurate as possible. I had learned that the newsroom depicted in the 1976 movie, "ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN" was slightly larger. Apparently, sometime between the newspaper's coverage of the Pentagon Papers and Watergate, its newsroom had been renovated and enlarged. Good catch on Carter and DeAngelo's part. Hollywood icon Ann Roth designed the costumes for the film and I must say that I was impressed. I was not impressed because I found her costumes dazzling or memorable. I was impressed because Roth, who had also served as costume designer for three of director Anthony Maghella's films, perfectly captured the fashion styles of the conservative Washington political set of the early 1970s.

Both Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks earned acting nominations - for their portrayals of Katherine Graham and Ben Bradlee. Streep is the only one who earned an Academy Award nod. I am a little conflicted about it. On one hand, I cannot deny that the two leads gave very good performances. Streep did an excellent job in conveying Graham's emotional growth into her role as her late husband's successor as owner of The Washington Post. And Hanks was first-rate as the ambitious and tenacious Bradlee, who saw The Post's acquisition of more excerpts from the Pentagon Papers as a step into transforming the newspaper as a major national periodical. The movie also featured an interesting performance from Bob Odenkirk, who portrayed Ben Bagkikian, the assistant editor who had decided to set out and find Ellsberg after the Attorney General's Office forced The New York Times to cease publication of the Papers. Another interesting performance came from Bruce Greenwood, whose portrayal of the besieged former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara really impressed me. 

I was surprised to discover that "THE POST" won a Best Ensemble award from the Detroit Film Critics Society. But you know what? Perhaps I should not have been that surprised. With a cast that included Carrie Coon, David Cross and Philip Casnoff; I really enjoyed those scenes featuring Bradlee with his senior staff, whether they were discussing or examining the Pentagon Papers. The movie also featured solid performances from Bradley Whitford, Sarah Poulson, Matthew Rhys, Michael Stulhbarg, Alison Brie, Jesse Plemmons, Pat Healy, and Zach Woods.

I can honestly say that I would not regard "THE POST" as one of my top five favorite movies directed by Steven Spielberg. In fact, I am not sure if I would regard it as one of his best films. But the movie proved to be one of my favorites released in 2017, thanks to Spielberg's direction, a first-rate screenplay written by Liz Hannah and Josh Singer, and an excellent cast led by Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks. I have a feeling that it is one movie that I would never get tired of watching.