Thursday, May 25, 2017

"CONDUCT UNBECOMING" (1975) Review

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"CONDUCT UNBECOMING" (1975) Review

Nearly five decades ago, 1969 to be precise, a play written by novelist Barry England was first staged at the Theater Royal in Bristol, England. Set during the height of the British Empire, England's play focused upon an Army regiment stationed in India. The play became a hit and was eventually adapted into a movie released to the public in 1975. 

"CONDUCT UNBECOMING" begins with two young British officers arriving in Indian to join a prestigious regiment. Lieutenant Drake comes from a middle-class background and is eager to make the right impression. Lieutenant Millington is the son of a General and does not seem enthusiastic over the idea of a military career. He plans to leave the Army at the first opportunity. While Drake manages to make a positive impression with his fellow officers, Millington antagonizes them with his cynical behavior, causing the other officers to dislike him. A military ceremony takes place, honoring the deceased members of the regiment and their widows, including Mrs. Marjorie Scarlett, whose husband won a posthumous Victoria Cross after being killed during a battle on the North-West Frontier. 

Later that evening, the regiment holds a ball. The younger officers take part in a ceremonial tradition that involves the pursuit and sticking of a pig in the mess. Lieutenant Millington tries to charm Mrs. Scarlett, but is lightly dismissed. Later, the disheveled widow bursts into the mess, claiming to have been attack. She identifies Milington as her attacker. During an evening in the mess, involving the younger officers taking part in a ceremonial tradition that involves the pursuit and sticking of a pig, Mrs Scarlett runs in claiming to have been attacked, and identifies Lieutenant Millington as her attacker. Although he is innocent, Millington sees the potential disgrace as an easy way to leave the Army and return to England. He does not bother to cooperate with Drake, who has been selected to defend him at his secret trial. But when both men realize that Millington might suffer a more serious punishment other than a dishonorable discharge and Drake discovers that another widow had been similarily attacked six months earlier, the latter officer goes out of his way to clear Millington.

I have not seen "CONDUCT UNBECOMING" for a good number of years - over a decade and a half, to be exact. I recall being very impressed when I last saw it a long time ago. I still am - to a certain extent. But there were two aspects of the movie that left me feeling a little unsettled. One of them focused upon the movie's setting. With the exception of the first ten to fifteen minutes, most of "CONDUCT UNBECOMING" was either set in the regiment's mess, other exterior shots or on the cantoment grounds, which could have easily been shot on a sounstage. By the time the movie ended, I felt as if I had watched a filmed play. And I never could understand Lieutenant Millington's original attitude toward the charges against him. I mean . . . this is the Victorian Age we are talking about in which women - especially white upper and middle-class women - were put on pedestals by men. I could understand Millington's attitude if he had been accused of assaulting the other acknowledged victim in the story - an Indian soldier's widow named Mrs. Bandanai. But surely he should have realized that he could have suffered serious repercussion for assaulting someone as cherished as Mrs. Scarlett, right off the bat.

Despite these shortcomings, I must admit that "CONDUCT UNBECOMING" is a first-rate movie. Playwright Barry England wrote a tantalizing peek into the world of British India that featured not only a psychological drama, but also a very interesting mystery and the damages causes by misogyny and racism (in the case of Mrs. Bandanai) that was rampant during the Victorian Age (as well as now). I feel that England created a murder mystery that would have done Agatha Christie proud. I also feel that Robert Enders did an excellent job in adapting England's play. 

The movie began with a great set-up of the mystery - the ceremony honoring the dead Captain Scarlett and the other men who died with him, intertwining with with the arrivals of Lieutenants Drake and Millington at the regiment's cantonment. The movie also had a rather creepy scene that featured the younger officers engaged in the "stick-the-pig-in-the-anal" game, which foreshadowed the attack on Mrs. Scarlett later in the evening. But what I really admired about the film is that it did not make it easy for the audience to guess the identity of Mrs. Scarlett's attacker. For that I am truly grateful. If there is one kind of mystery I cannot abide is one that gives away the culprit's identity prematurely.

"CONDUCT UNBECOMING" also benefited from a first-rate cast. The movie featured solid performances from the likes of James Faulkner (who portrayed Millington), Michael Culver, Rafiq Anwar, Persis Khambatta and James Donald. Christopher Plummer gave an interesting performance as the intimidating Major Alastair Wimbourne. Although there were moments when I found his performance a little theatrical. I certainly cannot accuse Trevor Howard's performance as theatrical. He gave an appropriately poignant performance as the regiment's aging commander, who finds it difficult to accept a possible scandal within his command. Richard Attenborough proved to be equally complex as Major Lionel E. Roach, who seemed to live and breathe the regiment. I was surprised to see Stacy Keach in this cast as Captain Harper, the officer charged with prosecuting Millington. He did an excellent job in developing his character from the hard-nosed, blindingly loyal officer, to one who finds himself appalled by the possibility of a serial attacker. Susannah York gave a superb role as the enticing Mrs. Scarlett, who seemed first amused by Millington's attempt at seduction and later, angry over what happened to her. But the film actually belonged to Michael York, who more than carried his weight as the main character. I was impressed by how he managed to dominate this film, while retaining his character's quiet and reserved nature.

Would I consider "CONDUCT UNBECOMING" a classic? I do not know. I certainly would not consider it a candidate for a Best Picture nomination. And it certainly had its flaws. But due to its first-rate story, solid direction from Michael Anderson and an excellent cast led by Michael York, I still would consider it a very good story that is worth viewing time and again.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

"KNOWING" (2009) Photo Gallery

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Below are images from the 2009 science-fiction thriller, "KNOWING". Directed by Alex Proyas, the movie starred Nicholas Cage: 


"KNOWING" (2009) Photo Gallery

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liam hemsworth

Monday, May 22, 2017

Top Ten Favorite Movies Set in the 1860s



Below is my current list of favorite movies set in the 1860s: 


TOP TEN FAVORITE MOVIES SET IN THE 1860s



1. "Lincoln" (2012) - Steven Spielberg directed this highly acclaimed film about President Abraham Lincoln's last four months in office and his efforts to pass the 13th Amendment to end slavery. Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis, Oscar nominee Sally Field and Oscar nominee Tommy Lee Jones starred.





2. "Shenandoah"(1965) - James Stewart starred in this bittersweet tale about how a Virginia farmer's efforts to keep his family out of the Civil War failed when his youngest son is mistaken as a Confederate soldier by Union troops and taken prisoner. Andrew V. McLaglen directed.





3. "Angels & Insects" (1995) - Philip Haas directed this adaptation of A.S. Byatt's 1992 novella, "Morpho Eugenia" about a Victorian naturalist who marries into the English landed gentry. Mark Rylance, Kristin Scott-Thomas and Patsy Kensit starred.





4. "Class of '61" (1993) - Dan Futterman and Clive Owen co-starred in this television movie about recent West Point graduates and their experiences during the first months of the Civil War. Produced by Steven Spielberg, the movie was directed by Gregory Hoblit.





5. "The Tall Target" (1951) - Anthony Mann directed this suspenseful tale about a New York City Police sergeant who stumbles across a plot to kill President-elect Lincoln and travels aboard the train carrying the latter to stop the assassination attempt. Dick Powell starred.





6. "Far From the Madding Crowd" (1967) - John Schlesinger directed this adaptation of Thomas Hardy's 1874 novel about a young Victorian woman torn between three men. The movie starred Julie Christie, Alan Bates, Terence Stamp and Peter Finch.





7. "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" (1966) - Sergio Leone directed this epic Spaghetti Western about three gunslingers in search of a cache of Confederate gold in New Mexico, during the Civil War. Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach starred.





8. "Cold Mountain" (2003) - Anthony Minghella directed this poignant adaptation of Charles Fraizer's 1997 novel about a Confederate Army deserter, who embarks upon a long journey to return home to his sweetheart, who is struggling to maintain her farm, following the death of her father. The movie starred Oscar nominees Jude Law and Nicole Kidman, along with Oscar winner Renee Zellweger.





9. "Little Women" (1994) - Gillian Armstrong directed this adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's 1868 novel about four sisters from an impoverished, yet genteel New England family. The movie starred Winona Ryder, Trini Alvarado, Christian Bale and Susan Sarandon.





10. "The Beguiled" (1971) - Clint Eastwood starred in this atmospheric adaptation of Thomas Cullinan's 1966 novel about a wounded Union soldier who finds refuge at an all-girl boarding school in 1863 Mississippi. Directed by Don Siegel, the movie co-starred Geraldine Page and Elizabeth Hartman.